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War

Video: St. Crispin’s Day Speech, Mark Rylance at the Globe

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Mark Rylance at the Globe as Henry V

 
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Richard III and the Sonnet

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“Now is the winter of our discontent” is nearly as familiar as Hamlet’s, “To be, or not to be” and Mark Antony’s, “Friends, Romans, countrymen”. Not one of these three passages is a dramatic dialogue. Mark Antony addresses a large Roman crowd in an extended speech. Hamlet muses to himself in a soliloquy while we the audience listen in. Richard, however,
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In Troy there lies the scene

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Enter the Prologue in armor.

In Troy there lies the scene.Hyperbaton From isles of Greece
The princes orgulousAnastrophe, their high blood chafed,
Have to the port of Athens sent their shipsHyperbaton
Fraught with the ministers and instruments
Of cruel war. Sixty and nine,
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Source:
Act 1
Line Prologue

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Now is the winter of our discontent

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NowHyperbaton is the winter of our discontentMetaphor
Made glorious summerMetaphor by this son of York,Paronomasia
And all the clouds that louredMetaphor upon our houseMetonymy
In the deep bosom of the ocean MetaphorburiedHyperbaton & Ellipsis.
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O my good lord, why are you thus alone?

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O my good lord, why are you thus alone?
For what offense have I this fortnight been
A banished woman from my Harry’s bed?
Tell me, sweet lord, what is ‘t that takes from thee
Thy stomach, pleasure, and thy golden sleep?
Why dost thou bend thine eyes upon the earth
And start so often when thou sit’st alone?
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 3
Line 39

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Connected Notes:
Wives and Troubled Husbands

This battle fares like to the morning’s war

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This battle fares like to the morning’s war,
When dying clouds contend with growing light,
What time the shepherd, blowing of his nails,
Can neither call it perfect day nor night.

Would I were dead, if God’s good will were so,
For what is in this world but grief and woe?

Simile, Anaphora & IsocolonNow sways it this way,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 5
Line 1

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If we are marked to die, we are enough

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If we are marked to die, we are enough
To do our country loss; and if to live,
The fewer men, the greater share of honor.
God’s will, I pray thee wish not one man more.
By Jove, I am not covetous for gold,
Nor care I who doth feed upon my cost;
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 3
Line 21

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Video: St. Crispin’s Day Speech, Mark Rylance at the Globe

The fingers of the powers above

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Soothsayer
The fingers of the powers above do tune
The harmony of this peace.Synecdoche and Metaphor
The vision
Which I made known to Lucius ere the stroke
Of this yet scarce-cold battle at this instant
Is full accomplished. For the Roman eagle,Metonymy
From south to west on wing soaring aloft,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 566

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Connected Notes:
Love and Water