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Madness

Is it a beggar-man?

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Gloucester
Is it a beggar-man?
Old Man
Madman and beggar too.
Gloucester
He has some reason, else he could not beg.
I’ th’ last night’s storm, I such a fellow saw,
Which made me think a man a worm. My son
Came then into my mind, and yet my mind
Was then scarce friends with him.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 33

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Themes:
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I will not speak with her

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Queen Gertrude
I will not speak with her.
Gentleman
She is importunate,
Indeed distract; her mood will needs be pitied.
Queen Gertrude
What would she have?

So full of artless jealousy is guilt,
It spills itself in fearing to be spilt.

Gentleman
She speaks much of her father,
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 5
Line 1

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Spoken by:
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Themes:
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Where is the beauteous Majesty of Denmark?

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Ophelia
Where is the beauteous Majesty of Denmark?
Queen
How now, Ophelia?
Ophelia sings

How should I your true love know
From another one?
By his cockle hat and staff
And his sandal shoon.

Queen
Alas,
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 5
Line 26

Source Type:
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Spoken by:
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Themes:

How now, what noise is that?

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Laertes
How now, what noise is that?
Enter Ophelia.
O heat, dry up my brains! Tears seven times salt
Burn out the sense and virtue of mine eye!
By heaven, thy madness shall be paid with weight
Till our scale turn the beam! O rose of May,
Dear maid, kind sister, sweet Ophelia!
O heavens,
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 5
Line 176

Source Type:
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Spoken by:
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Themes:

The King is mad

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The King is mad. How stiff is my vile sense
That I stand up and have ingenious feeling
Of my huge sorrows! Better I were distract.
So should my thoughts be severed from my griefs,
And woes, by wrong imaginations, lose
The knowledge of themselves.
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 6
Line 308

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:

’Tis strange, my Theseus, that these lovers speak of.

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Hippolyta
’Tis strange, my Theseus, that these lovers speak of.
Theseus
More strange than true. I never may believe
These antique fables nor these fairy toys.

The lunatic, the lover, and the poet
Are of imagination all compact.

Lovers and madmen have such seething brains,
Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend
More than cool reason ever comprehends.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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Themes:
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Connected Notes:
The Forms of Things Unknown