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Love

Love all, trust a few

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Love all, trust a few,
Do wrong to noneIsocolon
. Be able for thine enemy
Rather in power than use, and keep thy friend
Under thy own life’s key. Be check’d for silence,
But never tax’d for speechAlliosis
.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 66

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Now, our joy, Although our last and least

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King Lear
Now, our joy,
Although our last and least, to whose young love
The vines of France and milk of Burgundy
Strive to be interessed, what can you say to draw
A third more opulent than your sisters’? Speak.
Cordelia
Nothing, my lord.
King Lear
Nothing?
Cordelia
Nothing.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 91

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Is it but this—a tardiness in nature

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Is it but this—a tardiness in nature
Which often leaves the history unspoke
That it intends to do?—My lord of Burgundy,
What say you to the lady? Love’s not love
When it is mingled with regards that stands
Aloof from th’ entire point. Will you have her?
She is herself a dowry.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 272

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Fairest Cordelia, that art most rich being poor

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France
Fairest Cordelia, that art most rich being poor;
Most choice, forsaken; and most loved, despised,
Thee and thy virtues here I seize upon,
Be it lawful I take up what’s cast away.
Gods, gods! ‘Tis strange that from their cold’st neglect
My love should kindle to enflamed respect.—
Thy dowerless daughter, king, thrown to my chance,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 290

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Why, cousin! Why, Rosalind! Cupid have mercy

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Celia
Why, cousin! Why, Rosalind! Cupid have mercy,
not a word?
Rosalind
Not one to throw at a dog.
Celia
No, thy words are too precious to be cast away
upon curs. Throw some of them at me. Come, lame
me with reasons.

O, how full of briers is this working-day world!
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 11

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O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!

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O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!
It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
As a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear—Simili

Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!
So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows,
As yonder lady o’er her fellows shows.Simili

The measure done,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 5
Line 51

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If I profane with my unworthiest hand

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Romeo
If I profane with my unworthiest hand
This holy shrineMetaphor, the gentle sinOxymoron is this,
My lips, two blushing pilgrimsMetaphor, ready stand
To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.
Juliet
Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
Which mannerly devotion shows in this:
For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch,
And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kissAntanaclesis or Paronomasia.
Romeo
Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?
Juliet
Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in pray’r.
Romeo
O then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do,
They pray—grant thou, lest faith turn to despair.
Juliet
Saints do not move, though grant for prayers’ sake.
Romeo
Then move not while my prayer’s effect I take.
(Kisses her)
Thus from my lips, by thine, my sin is purg’d.
Juliet
Then have my lips the sin that they have took.
Romeo
Sin from my lips? O trespass sweetly urg’d!

Source:
Act 1
Scene 5
Line 104

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Connected Notes:
Sonnets in Romeo and Juliet, Caves, Temples & Palaces

My only love sprung from my only hate!

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My only love sprung from my only hate!Paradox
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!Epanalepsis
Prodigious birth of love it is to me
That I must love a loathèd enemy.Irony

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Source:
Act 1
Scene 5
Line 152

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Now old desire doth in his deathbed lie

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Now old desire doth in his deathbed lie,
And young affection gapes to be his heir;
That fair for which love groan’d for and would die,
With tender Juliet match’d, is now not fair.
Now Romeo is beloved and loves again,
Alike bewitchèd by the charm of looks,
But to his foe supposed he must complain,
And she steal love’s sweet bait from fearful hooks.
Being held a foe, he may not have access
To breathe such vows as lovers use to swear,
And she as much in love, her means much less
To meet her new belovèd anywhere.
But passion lends them power, time means, to meet
Temp’ring extremities with extreme sweet.

Source:
Act 2
Scene Prologue
Line 1

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Connected Notes:
Sonnets in Romeo and Juliet

Speak low if you speak love.

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Speak low if you speak love.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 97

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