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False Fronts

Iago and Ulysses on Order and Degree

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Ulysses and Iago express similar themes about order and degree. Iago speaks more specifically about seniority versus affections and recommendations.
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Appearance and Deception

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A recurring theme in many of Shakespeare’s plays, and central to Much Ado About Nothing, explores how easily people are deceived not just by the false testimony of others but even by their own senses. Claudio, believing he was deceived by Don John, learned to place no trust in the words of others. With “Let every eye negotiate for itself,”
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Now is the winter of our discontent

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NowHyperbaton is the winter of our discontentMetaphor
Made glorious summerMetaphor by this son of York,Paronomasia
And all the clouds that louredMetaphor upon our houseMetonymy
In the deep bosom of the ocean MetaphorburiedHyperbaton & Ellipsis.
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I find here that Don Pedro hath bestowed much honor

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Leonato
I find here that Don
Pedro hath bestowed much honor on a young
Florentine called Claudio.
Messenger
Much deserved on his part, and equally
remembered by Don Pedro.Anapodoton
He hath borne himself
beyond the promise of his age, doing in the figure
of a lamb the feats of a lion.

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Why, there’s no remedy

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Iago
Why, there’s no remedy. ‘Tis the curse of service.
Preferment goes by letter and affection,
And not by old gradation, where each second
Stood heir to th’ first. Now, sir, be judge yourself
Whether I in any just term am affined
To love the Moor.
Roderigo
I would not follow him, then.
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Troy, yet upon his basis, had been down

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Troy, yet upon his basis, had been down,
And the great Hector’s sword had lacked a masterMetonymy
But for these instances:
The specialty of rule hath been neglected,
And look how many Grecian tents do stand
Hollow upon this plain, so many hollow factions.
When that the general is not like the hive
To whom the foragers shall all repair,

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Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 79

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Figures of Speech:
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Connected Notes:
Iago and Ulysses on Order and Degree

Adieu, adieu, adieu. Remember me

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Ghost
Adieu, adieu, adieu. Remember me.
He exits.
Hamlet
O all you host of heaven! O Earth! What else?
And shall I couple hell? O fie! Hold, hold, my heart,
And you, my sinews, grow not instant old,
But bear me stiffly up.Apostrophe
Remember thee?
Ay,

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Source:
Act 1
Scene 5
Line 99

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Ophelia, walk you here

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Polonius
Ophelia, walk you here.—Gracious, so please you,
We will bestow ourselves.  To Ophelia.  Read on this book,
That show of such an exercise may color
Your loneliness. —We are oft to blame in this
(’Tis too much proved), that with devotion’s visage
And pious action we do sugar o’er
The devil himself.

’Tis too much proved,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 48

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Or if you like elsewhere, do it by stealth

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Or if you like elsewhere, do it by stealth,
Muffle your false love with some show of blindness:
Let not my sister read it in your eyeHyperbaton;
Be not thy tongue thy own shame’s oratorHyperbaton and Synecdoche:
Look sweet, speak fair, become disloyaltyIsocolon;
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 8

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Figures of Speech:
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Connected Notes:
Keeping Adultery Hidden

O serpent heart, hid with a flow’ring face!

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O serpent heart, hid with a flow’ring face!Paradox
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?Metaphor
Beautiful tyrant!Oxymoron Fiend angelical!Oxymoron
Dove-feather’d raven!Oxymoron Wolvish ravening lamb!Oxymoron

Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound?
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 79

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Connected Notes:
Caves, Temples & Palaces

My gracious lord, Henry, your foe, is taken

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Nobleman
My gracious lord, Henry, your foe, is taken
And brought your prisoner to your palace gate.
King Edward
See that he be conveyed unto the Tower.
Nobleman exits.
And go we, brothers, to the man that took him,
To question of his apprehension.—
Widow, go you along.—Lords, use her honorably.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 120

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In Venice they do let God see the pranks

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In Venice they do let God see the pranks
They dare not show their husbands; their best conscience
Is not to leave’t undone, but keep’t unknown.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 3

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

Connected Notes:
Keeping Adultery Hidden