Shakespeare quotes, notes, timelines & more

Home » Reading Will » Figures of Speech » Themes » Death

Death

Tombs and Wombs

Read the Note

Friar Lawrence’s rumination on soil as both a tomb and a womb works as a metaphor of one of the play’s central themes. The “misadventure’d piteous overthrows” of  Romeo and Juliet in the Capulet tomb at the end of the play gave birth to a growth of amity between their two families.
… continue reading this note

Here the anthem doth commence

Read the Quote

Here the anthem doth commence:
Love and constancy is dead,
Phoenix and the turtle fled
In a mutual flame from hence.

Source:
Line 21

Source Type:

Themes:
, ,

Beauty, truth, and rarity

Read the Quote

Beauty, truth, and rarity,
Grace in all simplicity,
Here enclosed, in cinders lie.

Source:
Line 53

Source Type:

Themes:
, ,

Two households, both alike in dignity

Read the Sonnet

Two households, both alike in dignity,
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
From ancient grudgeParenthesis
break to new mutiny,
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.Antanaclesis & Synecdoche
From forth the fatal loins of these two foesAlliteration & Synecdoche
A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;Epithet
Whose misadventur'd piteous overthrows
Doth with their deathAlliteration bury their parents' strife.
The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love,Transferred Epithets
And the continuance of their parents' rage,
Which, but their children's end, nought could remove,Parenthesis
Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage;
The which if you with patient ears attend,
What here Alliterationshall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.Parenthesis & Synecdoche

When beggars die there are no comets seen

Read the Quote

Calphurnia
When beggars die there are no comets seen;
The heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes.
Julius Caesar
Cowards die many times before their deaths,
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 31

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:

O, fellow, come, the song we had last night

Read the Quote

Orsino
O, fellow, come, the song we had last night.—
Mark it, Cesario. It is old and plain;
The spinsters and the knitters in the sun
And the free maids that weave their thread with
bones
Do use to chant it. It is silly sooth,
And dallies with the innocence of love
Like the old age.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 4
Line 48

Source Type:
,

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

Admit no other way to save his life

Read the Quote

Angelo
Admit no other way to save his life—
As I subscribe not that, nor any other—
But, in the loss of question, that you, his sister,
Finding yourself desired of such a person
Whose credit with the judge, or own great place,
Could fetch your brother from Metaphorthe manacles
Of the binding law,

… continue reading this quote

This battle fares like to the morning’s war

Read the Quote

This battle fares like to the morning’s war,
When dying clouds contend with growing light,
What time the shepherd, blowing of his nails,
Can neither call it perfect day nor night.

Would I were dead, if God’s good will were so,
For what is in this world but grief and woe?

Simile, Anaphora & IsocolonNow sways it this way,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 5
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
, , ,

Figures of Speech:
, , ,

I am hurt. A plague o’ both houses!

Read the Quote

Mercutio
I am hurt.
A plague o’ both houses! I am sped.
Is he gone and hath nothing?
Benvolio
What, art thou hurt?
Mercutio
Ay, ay, a scratch, a scratch. Marry, ’tis enough.
Where is my page?—Go, villain, fetch a surgeon.
   Page exits.

No, ’tis not so deep as a well,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 93

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:

Connected Notes:
A Plague and a Scourge

Fates, we will know your pleasures

Read the Quote

Brutus
Fates, we will know your pleasures.Personification
That we shall die, we know, ’tis but the time,
And drawing days out, that men stand upon.
Casca
Why, he that cuts off twenty years of life
Cuts off so many years of fearing death.
Brutus
Grant that,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 109

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, , ,

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:

O mighty Caesar! Dost thou lie so low?

Read the Quote

O mighty Caesar! Dost thou lie so low?
Are all thy conquests, glories, triumphs, spoils,
Shrunk to this little measure? Fare thee well!
I know not, gentlemen, what you intend,
Who else must be let blood, who else is rank;
If I myself, there is no hour so fit
As Caesar’s death’s hour, nor no instrument
Of half that worth as those your swords,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 164

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes: