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Anger

Banishment: Romeo and Coriolanus

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For two of Shakespeare’s most passionate male characters, banishment holds passionately different meanings. Romeo, banished from Verona, is grief-stricken and in fear of never seeing Juliet again. For him, banishment is the equivalent of death. Coriolanus, banished from Rome, is enraged and contemptuous of the plebeians who he hopes he will never have to see again. For him, banishment is an opportunity for a new life. 
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Animal Imagery

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Animal imagery dominates Henry VI, Part 3, as in two passages here:

Margaret
And yet shalt thou be safe? Such safety finds

The trembling lamb environèd with wolves.
Had I been there, which am a silly woman,
The soldiers should have tossed me on their pikes
Before I would have granted to that act…
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Video: Thou bleeding piece of earth

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Marlon Brando as Mark Antony in the 1953 film of Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar directed by Joseph Mankiewicz.


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This butcher’s cur is venomed-mouthed

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Buckingham
This butcher’s cur is venomed-mouthed, and I
Have not the power to muzzle him; therefore best
Not wake him in his slumber. A beggar’s book
Outworths a noble’s blood.Metaphors

Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot
That it do singe yourself.

Norfolk
What,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 143

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Fire and Gold

Now bind my brows with iron

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Northumberland
Now bind my brows with iron, and approach
The ragged’st hour that time and spite dare bring
To frown upon th’ enraged Northumberland.
Let heaven kiss Earth! Now let not Nature’s hand
Keep the wild flood confined. Let order die,
And let this world no longer be a stage
To feed contention in a lingering act;
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 166

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Pardon me, Margaret.—Pardon me, sweet son

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King Henry
Pardon me, Margaret.—Pardon me, sweet son.
The Earl of Warwick and the Duke enforced me.
Queen Margaret 
Enforced thee? Art thou king and wilt be forced?
I shame to hear thee speak. Ah, timorous wretch,
Thou hast undone thyself, thy son, and me,
And giv’n unto the house of York such head
As thou shalt reign but by their sufferance!
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 236

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Animal Imagery

Set down, set down your honorable load

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Set down, set down your honorable load,Epimone
If honor may be shrouded in a hearse,Personification
Whilst I awhile obsequiously lament
Th’ untimely fall of virtuous Lancaster.
   They set down the bier.
Poor key-cold figure of a holy king,Alliteration
Pale ashes of the house of Lancaster,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 1

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She-wolf of France, but worse than wolves of France

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She-wolf of France, but worse than wolves of France,
Whose Synecdochetongue more poisons than the adder’s tooth:Metaphor, Diacope & Parenthesis

How ill-beseeming is it in thy sex
To triumph like an Amazonian trull
Upon their woes whom Fortune captivates.Simile

O, tiger’s heart wrapped in a woman’s hide,
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Avaunt! Begone! Thou hast set me on the rack

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Othello
Avaunt! Begone! Thou hast set me on the rack.
I swear ’tis better to be much abused
Than but to know ‘t a little.
Iago
How now, my lord?

He that is robbed, not wanting what is stol’n,
Let him not know ‘t, and he’s not robbed at all.

Othello
What sense had I of her stol’n hours of lust?
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 3
Line 385

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Hear me, for I will speak

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Marcus Brutus
Hear me, for I will speak.
Must I give way and room to your rash choler?
Shall I be frighted when a madman stares?Pysma & Hendiadys

Cassius
O ye gods, ye gods, must I endure all this?Apostrophe & Epizeuxis
Marcus Brutus
All this?
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 3
Line 42

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O Cassius, you are yokèd with a lamb

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O Cassius, you are yokèd with a lambMetaphor
That carries anger as the flint bears fire,
Who, much enforced, shows a hasty spark,
And straight is cold again.Simile

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Source:
Act 4
Scene 3
Line 124

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If you go on thus, you will kill yourself

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Leonato’s Brother
If you go on thus, you will kill yourself,
And ’tis not wisdom thus to second grief
Against yourself.
Leonato
I pray thee, cease thy counsel,
Which falls into mine ears as profitless
As water in a sieve. Give not me counsel,
Nor let no comforter delight mine ear
But such a one whose wrongs do suit with mine.
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line 1

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Nay, be not angry, sir

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Lord
Nay, be not angry, sir.
Posthumus
’Lack, to what end?
Who dares not stand his foe, I’ll be his friend;
For if he’ll do as he is made to do,
I know he’ll quickly fly my friendship too.
You have put me into rhyme.
Lord
Farewell. You’re angry.
 He exits.
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 3
Line 65

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