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Adultery

Keeping Adultery Hidden

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In comedy or tragedy, Shakespeare’s characters advise the prudence of spouses keeping their dalliances hidden. In Comedy of Errors, Luciana advises Antipholus of Syracuse, who she thinks is her brother-in-lawto conceal from his presumed wife Adriana, Luciana’s sister, his apparent infidelity. Iago’s observation about the adulteries of Venetian women in Othello, is similar.
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Ay, ay, Antipholus, look strange and frown

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Ay, ay, Antipholus, look strange and frown.
Some other mistress hath thy sweet aspects.
I am not Adriana, nor thy wife.The time was onceHyperbaton when thou unurged wouldst vowAnastrophe
That never words were music to thine ear,
That never object pleasing in thine eye,
That never touch well welcome to thy hand,

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And may it be that you have quite forgot

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Luciana
And may it be that you have quite forgot
 A husband’s office? Shall, Antipholus,
Even in the spring of love thy love-springs rot?
 Shall love, in building, grow so ruinous?

Bear a fair presence, though your heart be tainted.
 Teach sin the carriage of a holy saint.
Be secret-false. What need she be acquainted?
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In Venice they do let God see the pranks

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In Venice they do let God see the pranks
They dare not show their husbands; their best conscience
Is not to leave’t undone, but keep’t unknown.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 3

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Keeping Adultery Hidden

Had it pleased heaven To try me with affliction

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Othello
Had it pleased heaven
To try me with affliction, had they rained
All kind of sores and shames on my bare head,
Steeped me in poverty to the very lips,
Given to captivity me and my utmost hopes,
I should have found in some place of my soul
A drop of patience.

Was this fair paper,
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 2
Line 57

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I have heard it said, the fittest time to corrupt a man’s wife

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I have heard it said, the fittest time to corrupt a man’s wife is when she’s fall’n out with her husband.
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 3
Line 31

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I know that voice

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Gloucester
I know that voice.
Lear
Ha! Goneril with a white beard? They flattered
me like a dog and told me I had the white hairs in
my beard ere the black ones were there. To say “ay”
and “no” to everything that I said “ay” and “no” to
was no good divinity. When the rain came to wet me
once and the wind to make me chatter,
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 6
Line 114

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