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Richard III

What news, what news in this our tott’ring state?

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Hastings
What news, what news in this our tott’ring state?
Catesby
It is a reeling world indeed, my lord,
And I believe will never stand upright
Till Richard wear the garland of the realm.
Hastings
How “wear the garland”? Dost thou mean the crown?
Catesby
Ay, my good lord.
… continue reading this quote

Act 3
Scene 2
Line 38

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,

Where is my lord the Duke of Gloucester?

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Ely
Where is my lord the Duke of Gloucester?
I have sent for these strawberries.
Hastings
His Grace looks cheerfully and smooth this morning.
There’s some conceit or other likes him well
When that he bids good morrow with such spirit.

I think there’s never a man in Christendom
Can lesser hide his love or hate than he,
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Act 3
Scene 4
Line 48

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O momentary grace of mortal men

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Hastings
O momentary grace of mortal men,
Which we more hunt for than the grace of God!
Who builds his hope in air of your good looks
Lives like a drunken sailor on a mast,
Ready with every nod to tumble down
Into the fatal bowels of the deep.

Come, lead me to the block.
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Act 3
Scene 4
Line 98

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,

Come, cousin, canst thou quake and change thy color

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Richard
Come, cousin, canst thou quake and change thy color,
Murder thy breath in middle of a word,
And then again begin, and stop again,
As if thou were distraught and mad with terror?
Buckingham
Tut, I can counterfeit the deep tragedian,
Speak, and look back, and pry on every side,
Tremble and start at wagging of a straw,
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Act 3
Scene 5
Line 1

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,

Here is the head of that ignoble traitor

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Lovell
Here is the head of that ignoble traitor,
The dangerous and unsuspected Hastings.
Richard
So dear I loved the man that I must weep.
I took him for the plainest harmless creature
That breathed upon the Earth a Christian;
Made him my book, wherein my soul recorded
The history of all her secret thoughts.
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Act 3
Scene 5
Line 22

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Here is the indictment of the good Lord Hastings

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Here is the indictment of the good Lord Hastings,
Which in a set hand fairly is engrossed,
That it may be today read o’er in Paul’s.

Who is so gross
That cannot see this palpable device?
Yet who so bold but says he sees it not?

And mark how well the sequel hangs together:
Eleven hours I have spent to write it over,
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Act 3
Scene 6
Line 1

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How now, how now? What say the citizens?

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Richard
How now, how now? What say the citizens?
Buckingham
Now, by the holy mother of our Lord,
The citizens are mum, say not a word.
Richard
Touched you the bastardy of Edward’s children?

Now, by the holy mother of our Lord,
The citizens are mum, say not a word.
… continue reading this quote

Act 3
Scene 7
Line 1

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,

Ah ha, my lord, this prince is not an Edward!

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Buckingham
Ah ha, my lord, this prince is not an Edward!
He is not lolling on a lewd love-bed,
But on his knees at meditation;
Not dallying with a brace of courtesans,
But meditating with two deep divines;
Not sleeping, to engross his idle body,
But praying, to enrich his watchful soul.
Happy were England would this virtuous prince
Take on his Grace the sovereignty thereof.
… continue reading this quote

Act 3
Scene 7
Line 72

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,

I do suspect I have done some offense

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Richard
I do suspect I have done some offense
That seems disgracious in the city’s eye,
And that you come to reprehend my ignorance.
Buckingham
You have, my lord. Would it might please your Grace,
On our entreaties, to amend your fault.
Richard
Else wherefore breathe I in a Christian land?
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Act 3
Scene 7
Line 112

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I cannot tell if to depart in silence

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I cannot tell if to depart in silence
Or bitterly to speak in your reproof
Best fitteth my degree or your condition.
If not to answer, you might haply think
Tongue-tied ambition, not replying, yielded
To bear the golden yoke of sovereignty,
Which fondly you would here impose on me.

I would rather hide me from my greatness,
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Act 3
Scene 7
Line 143

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