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Henry IV Pt 2

Written: c. 1597-98; Texts: Quarto 1600, First Folio 1623 (History)
Source: Holinshed, Raphael (c. 1528-c. 1580). The Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland. (2nd ed., 1587); The Famous Victories of Henry the Fifth (c. 1586); Hall, Edward (1498-1547). The Union of the Two Noble and Illustre Families of Lancaster and York (3rd. ed., 1550); Daniel, Samuel (c.1562-1619). The Civil Wars between the Two Houses of Lancaster and York (1595-1609); William Baldwin ed. The Mirror for Magistrates (1559 ed.)
Characters: Henry IV, Prince Henry, Sir John Falstaff, Richard Scroop Archbishop of York, Earl of Westmorland, Prince John of Lancaster, Henry Percy Earl of Northumberland, Lord Chief Justice, Lord Bardoph, Shallow, Morton, Earl of Warwick, Pistol
Setting: London
Time: AD 1403-1413

Henry IV Part 2 is the second play in what scholars refer to as the Henriad, an allusion to Virgil's Aeneid. The Henriad, Shakespeare's epic account of King Henry V, includes Henry IV Part 1, Henry IV Part 2, and Henry V. Those three plays combined with their prequel, Richard II, comprise what is now known as the Second Tetralogy, written between 1597 and 1598. The First Tetralogy, written earlier between 1591 and 1595, comprises Henry VI Part 1Henry VI Part 2, Henry VI Part 3, and Richard III.

Now bind my brows with iron

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Northumberland
Now bind my brows with iron, and approach
The ragged’st hour that time and spite dare bring
To frown upon th’ enraged Northumberland.
Let heaven kiss Earth! Now let not Nature’s hand
Keep the wild flood confined. Let order die,
And let this world no longer be a stage
To feed contention in a lingering act;
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Act 1
Scene 1
Line 166

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What is the gross sum that I owe thee?

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Falstaff
What is the gross sum that I owe thee?
Hostess
Marry, if thou wert an honest man, thyself
and the money too. Thou didst swear to me upon a
parcel-gilt goblet, sitting in my Dolphin chamber at
the round table by a sea-coal fire, upon Wednesday
in Wheeson week, when the Prince broke thy head
for liking his father to a singing-man of Windsor,
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Act 2
Scene 1
Line 87

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God save you, Sir John

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Pistol
God save you, Sir John.
Falstaff
Welcome, Ancient Pistol. Here, Pistol, I
charge you with a cup of sack. Do you discharge
upon mine hostess.
Pistol
I will discharge upon her, Sir John, with two bullets.
Falstaff
She is pistol-proof. Sir, you shall not hardly
offend her.
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Act 2
Scene 4
Line 111

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How many thousand of my poorest subjects

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How many thousand of my poorest subjects
Are at this hour asleep! O sleep, O gentle sleep,
Nature’s soft nurse, how have I frightened thee,
That thou no more will weigh my eyelids down,
And steep my senses in forgetfulness?Personification

Uneasy lies the head that wears the crown.

Why rather, sleep, liest thou in smoky cribs,
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Act 3
Scene 1
Line 4

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O God, that one might read the book of fate

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King
O God, that one might read the book of fate
And see the revolution of the times
Make mountains level, and the continent,
Weary of solid firmness, melt itself
Into the sea, and other times to see
The beachy girdle of the ocean
Too wide for Neptune’s hips; how chance’s mocks
And changes fill the cup of alteration
With divers liquors!
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Act 3
Scene 1
Line 45

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Fie, this is hot weather, gentlemen

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Falstaff
Fie, this is hot weather, gentlemen. Have you
provided me here half a dozen sufficient men?
Shallow
Marry, have we, sir. Will you sit?
   They sit at a table.
Falstaff
Let me see them, I beseech you.

Thy mother’s son! Like enough, and thy
father’s shadow.
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Act 3
Scene 2
Line 96

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You are well encountered here

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John of Lancaster
You are well encountered here, my cousin Mowbray.—
Good day to you, gentle Lord Archbishop,—
And so to you, Lord Hastings, and to all.—
My Lord of York, it better showed with you
When that your flock, assembled by the bell,
Encircled you to hear with reverence
Your exposition on the holy text
Than now to see you here,
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Act 4
Scene 1
Line 242

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What’s your name, sir?

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Falstaff
What’s your name, sir? Of what condition are
you, and of what place, I pray?
Colevile
I am a knight, sir, and my name is Colevile of
the Dale.
Falstaff
Well then, Colevile is your name, a knight is
your degree, and your place the Dale. Colevile shall
be still your name,
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Act 4
Scene 2
Line 1

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Fore God, you have here a goodly dwelling

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Falstaff
Fore God, you have here a goodly dwelling,
and a  rich.
Shallow
Barren, barren, barren, beggars all, beggars
all, Sir John. Marry, good air.—Spread, Davy,
spread, Davy. Well said, Davy.
Falstaff
This Davy serves you for good uses. He is
your servingman and your husband.
Shallow
A good varlet,
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Act 5
Scene 3
Line 5

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