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You are dull, Casca

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You are dull, Casca; and those sparks of life
That should be in a Roman you do want,
Or else you use not. You look pale, and gaze,
And put on fear, and cast yourself in wonder,Polysyndeton

To see the strange impatience of the heavens;
But if you would consider the true cause
Why all these fires,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 60

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Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
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You are not well. Remain here in the cave.

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Belarius, as Morgan, to Fidele
You are not well. Remain here in the cave.
We’ll come to you after hunting.
Arviragus, as Cadwal, to Fidel
Brother, stay here.
Are we not brothers?

I am ill, but your being by me
Cannot amend me. Society is no comfort
To one not sociable.
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 2
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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You are sent for to the Capitol

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You are sent for to the Capitol. ‘Tis thought
That Martius shall be consul.
I have seen the dumb men throng to see him, and
The blind to hear him speak. Matrons flung gloves,
Ladies and maids their scarfs and handkerchers,
Upon him as he pass'd; the nobles bended,
As to Jove's statue, and the commons made
A shower and thunder with their caps and shouts.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 292

Source Type:

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You are well encountered here

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John of Lancaster
You are well encountered here, my cousin Mowbray.—
Good day to you, gentle Lord Archbishop,—
And so to you, Lord Hastings, and to all.—
My Lord of York, it better showed with you
When that your flock, assembled by the bell,
Encircled you to hear with reverence
Your exposition on the holy text
Than now to see you here,
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 242

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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You bear a gentle mind, and heav’nly blessings

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Chamberlain
You bear a gentle mindSynecdoche, and heav’nly blessings
Follow such creatures. That you may, fair lady,
Perceive I speak sincerely, and high note’s
Ta’en of your many virtues, the King’s Majesty
Commends his good opinion of you to you, and
Does purpose honor to youAnthimeria no less flowing
Than Marchioness of Pembroke,
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You break jests as braggards do their blades

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You break jests as braggards do their bladesSimili, which, God be thank'd, hurt not.
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 1

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Figures of Speech:

You common cry of curs

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You common cry of curs, Anaphorawhose breath I hate
SimileAs reek a' th' rotten fens, whose loves I prize
SimileAs the dead carcasses of unburied men
That do corrupt my airAlliteration & Metaphor
—I banish you!

For you, the city,
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You did mistake him sure

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Arviragus, as Cadwal
You did mistake him sure.
Belarius, as Morgan
I cannot tell. Long is it since I saw him,
But time hath nothing blurred those lines of favor
Which then he wore. The snatches in his voice
And burst of speaking were as his. I am absolute
’Twas very Cloten.
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 2
Line 134

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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You do not meet a man but frowns

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First Gentleman
You do not meet a man but frowns. Our bloods
No more obey the heavens than our courtiers’
Still seem as does the King’s.Ellipsis

Second Gentleman
But what’s the matter?

Howsoe’er ’tis strange,
Or that the negligence may well be laughed at,
Yet is it true,
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You do seem to know Something of me

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Imogen
You do seem to know
Something of me or what concerns me. Pray you,
Since doubting things go ill often hurts more
Than to be sure they do—for certainties
Either are past remedies, or, timely knowing,
The remedy then born—discover to me
What both you spur and stop.

I dedicate myself to your sweet pleasure

Iachimo
Had I this cheek
To bathe my lips upon;
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 6
Line 112

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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You elves of hills, brooks, standing lakes, and groves

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Prospero draws a large circle on the stage with his staff.

 

Prospero
You elves of hills, brooks, standing lakes, and groves,
And you that on the sands with printless foot
Do chase the ebbing Neptune, and do fly him
When he comes back; you demi-puppets that
By moonshine do the green sour ringlets make,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line 42

Source Type:
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Spoken by:
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You have been a scourge to her enemies

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Fourth Roman Citizen
You have been a scourge to her enemies, you have been a rod to her friends; you have not indeed lov'd the common people.Anaphora
Coriolanus
You should account me the more virtuous that I have not been common in my love. I will, sir, flatter my sworn brother, the people,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 3
Line 100

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You have broken The article of your oath

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Caesar
You have broken
The article of your oath, which you shall never
Have tongue to charge me with.
Lepidus
Soft, Caesar!
Antony
No, Lepidus, let him speak.
The honor is sacred which he talks on now,
Supposing that I lacked it.—But on, Caesar:
The article of my oath?
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 98

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You have done well by water

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Enobarbus
You have done well by water.
Menas
And you by land.
Enobarbus
I will praise any man that will praise me,
though it cannot be denied what I have done by land.
Menas
Nor what I have done by water.
Enobarbus
Yes, something you can deny for your own
safety: you have been a great thief by sea.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 6
Line 113

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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You have simply misused our sex in your love-prate

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Celia
You have simply misused our sex in your love-prate.
We must have your doublet and hose plucked
over your head and show the world what the bird
hath done to her own nest.

O coz, coz, coz, my pretty little coz, that thou
didst know how many fathom deep I am in love.

Rosalind
O coz,
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 214

Source Type:

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You know your own degrees; sit down

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Macbeth
You know your own degrees; sit down. At first
And last, the hearty welcome.  They sit.
Lords
Thanks to your Majesty.
Macbeth
Ourself will mingle with society
And play the humble host.
Our hostess keeps her state, but in best time
We will require her welcome.

But now I am cabined,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 4
Line 1

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Figures of Speech:
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You know, Helen, I am a mother to you

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Countess
You know, Helen, I am a mother to you.
Helen
Mine honorable mistress.

I know I love in vain, strive against hope,
Yet in this captious and intenible sieve
I still pour in the waters of my love

Countess
Nay, a mother.
Why not a mother? When I said “a mother,”
Methought you saw a serpent.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 140

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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Themes:
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You ladies, you whose gentle hearts do fear

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Snug, as Lion
You ladies, you whose gentle hearts do fear
The smallest monstrous mouse that creeps on floor,
May now perchance both quake and tremble here,
When lion rough in wildest rage doth roar.
Then know that I, as Snug the joiner, am
A lion fell, nor else no lion’s dam;
For if I should as lion come in strife
Into this place,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line 232

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You look not well, Signior Antonio

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Gratiano
You look not well, Signior Antonio.
You have too much respect upon the world.
They lose it that do buy it with much care.
Believe me, you are marvelously changed.
Antonio

I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano,
A stage where every man must play a part,
And mine a sad one.

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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 77

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Connected Notes:
The Sadness of the Merchant

You look wearily

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Miranda
You look wearily.
Ferdinand
No, noble mistress, ’tis fresh morning with me
When you are by at night. I do beseech you,
Chiefly that I might set it in my prayers,
What is your name?

But you, O you,
So perfect and so peerless, are created
Of every creature’s best.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 40

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