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You do seem to know Something of me

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Imogen
You do seem to know
Something of me or what concerns me. Pray you,
Since doubting things go ill often hurts more
Than to be sure they do—for certainties
Either are past remedies, or, timely knowing,
The remedy then born—discover to me
What both you spur and stop.

I dedicate myself to your sweet pleasure

Iachimo
Had I this cheek
To bathe my lips upon;
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 6
Line 112

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

You elves of hills, brooks, standing lakes, and groves

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Prospero draws a large circle on the stage with his staff.

 

Prospero
You elves of hills, brooks, standing lakes, and groves,
And you that on the sands with printless foot
Do chase the ebbing Neptune, and do fly him
When he comes back; you demi-puppets that
By moonshine do the green sour ringlets make,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line 42

Source Type:
,

Spoken by:
,

You have been a scourge to her enemies

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Fourth Roman Citizen
You have been a scourge to her enemies, you have been a rod to her friends; you have not indeed lov'd the common people.Anaphora
Coriolanus
You should account me the more virtuous that I have not been common in my love. I will, sir, flatter my sworn brother, the people,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 3
Line 100

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

Figures of Speech:

You have broken The article of your oath

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Caesar
You have broken
The article of your oath, which you shall never
Have tongue to charge me with.
Lepidus
Soft, Caesar!
Antony
No, Lepidus, let him speak.
The honor is sacred which he talks on now,
Supposing that I lacked it.—But on, Caesar:
The article of my oath?
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 98

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

You have done well by water

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Enobarbus
You have done well by water.
Menas
And you by land.
Enobarbus
I will praise any man that will praise me,
though it cannot be denied what I have done by land.
Menas
Nor what I have done by water.
Enobarbus
Yes, something you can deny for your own
safety: you have been a great thief by sea.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 6
Line 113

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

You have simply misused our sex in your love-prate

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Celia
You have simply misused our sex in your love-prate.
We must have your doublet and hose plucked
over your head and show the world what the bird
hath done to her own nest.

O coz, coz, coz, my pretty little coz, that thou
didst know how many fathom deep I am in love.

Rosalind
O coz,
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 214

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:

Figures of Speech:

You juggler, you cankerblossom

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Hermia
You juggler, you cankerblossom,
You thief of love! What, have you come by night
And stol’n my love’s heart from him?
Helena
Fine, i’ faith.
Have you no modesty, no maiden shame,
No touch of bashfulness? What, will you tear
Impatient answers from my gentle tongue?
Fie, fie, you counterfeit, you puppet,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 296

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

You know, Helen, I am a mother to you

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Countess
You know, Helen, I am a mother to you.
Helen
Mine honorable mistress.

I know I love in vain, strive against hope,
Yet in this captious and intenible sieve
I still pour in the waters of my love

Countess
Nay, a mother.
Why not a mother? When I said “a mother,”
Methought you saw a serpent.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 140

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
,

You look not well, Signior Antonio

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Gratiano
You look not well, Signior Antonio.
You have too much respect upon the world.
They lose it that do buy it with much care.
Believe me, you are marvelously changed.
Antonio

I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano,
A stage where every man must play a part,
And mine a sad one.

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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 77

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , ,

Connected Notes:
The Sadness of the Merchant

You look wearily

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Miranda
You look wearily.
Ferdinand
No, noble mistress, ’tis fresh morning with me
When you are by at night. I do beseech you,
Chiefly that I might set it in my prayers,
What is your name?

But you, O you,
So perfect and so peerless, are created
Of every creature’s best.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 40

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

You may see, Lepidus, and henceforth know

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Caesar
You may see, Lepidus, and henceforth know,
It is not Caesar's natural vice to hate
Our great competitor. From Alexandria
This is the news: he fishes, drinks, and wastes
The lamps of night in revel, is not more manlike
Than Cleopatra, nor the queen of Ptolemy
More womanly than he; hardly gave audience, or
Vouchsafed to think he had partners.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 4
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

You men of Angiers, open wide your gates

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French Herald
You men of Angiers, open wide your gates,
And let young Arthur, Duke of Brittany, in,
Who by the hand of France this day hath made
Much work for tears in many an English mother,
Whose sons lie scattered on the bleeding ground.
Many a widow's husband groveling lies
Coldly embracing the discolored earth,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 312

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

You sad-faced men, people and sons of Rome

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You sad-faced men, people and sons of Rome,
By uproars severed as a flight of fowl
Scattered by winds and high tempestuous gusts,
O, let me teach you how to knit again
This scattered corn into one mutual sheaf,
These broken limbs again into one body,
Lest Rome herself be bane unto herself,
And she whom mighty kingdoms curtsy to,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 3
Line 68

Source Type:

Spoken by:

You saw The ceremony?

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Second Gentleman
You saw
The ceremony?
Third Gentleman
That I did.
First Gentleman
How was it?
Third Gentleman
Well worth the seeing.

At length her Grace rose, and with modest paces
Came to the altar, where she kneeled and saintlike
Cast her fair eyes to heaven and prayed devoutly

Second Gentleman
Good sir,
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 72

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

You see me, Lord Bassanio, where I stand

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You see me, Lord Bassanio, where I stand,
Such as I am. Though for myself alone
I would not be ambitious in my wish
To wish myself much better, yet for you
I would be trebled twenty times myself,
A thousand times more fair, ten thousand times
More rich, that only to stand high in your account
I might in virtues,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 153

Source Type:

Spoken by:

You see me, Lord Bassanio, where I stand

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You see me, Lord Bassanio, where I stand,
Such as I am. Though for myself alone
I would not be ambitious in my wish
To wish myself much better, yet for you
I would be trebled twenty times myself,
A thousand times more fair, ten thousand times
More rich, that only to stand high in your account,
I might in virtues,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 153

Source Type:

Spoken by:

You see this confluence, this great flood of visitors

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Poet
You see this confluence, this great flood of visitors.
(Indicating his poem.)
I have in this rough work shaped out a man
Whom this beneath world doth embrace and hug
With amplest entertainment. My free drift
Halts not particularly but moves itself
In a wide sea of wax. No leveled malice
Infects one comma in the course I hold,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 51

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

You see this confluence, this great flood of visitors

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Poet
You see this confluence, this great flood of visitors. Indicating his poem.
I have in this rough work shaped out a man
Whom this beneath world doth embrace and hug
With amplest entertainment. My free drift
Halts not particularly but moves itself
In a wide sea of wax. No leveled malice
Infects one comma in the course I hold,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 51

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

You shall do marvelous wisely

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Polonius
You shall do marvelous wisely, good Reynaldo,
Before you visit him, to make inquire
Of his behavior.
Reynaldo
My lord, I did intend it.
Polonius
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Marry, well said, very well said. Look you, sir,
Inquire me first what Danskers are in Paris;
And how, and who, what means, and where they keep,

Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 3

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

You would not hear me

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Flavius
You would not hear me.
At many leisures I proposed—
Timon
Go to.
Perchance some single vantages you took
When my indisposition put you back,
And that unaptness made your minister
Thus to excuse yourself.

O my good lord, the world is but a word.
Were it all yours to give it in a breath,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 142

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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