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Women will love her, that she is a woman

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Women will love her, that she is a woman
More worth than any man; men, that she is
The rarest of all womenEllipsis

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Source:
Act 5
Scene 1

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Figures of Speech:

Words, words, words

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Hamlet
Words, words, words.Epizeuxis
Polonius
What is the matter, my lord?
Hamlet
Between who?
Polonius
I mean the matter Antanaclesis
that you read, my lord.

Though this be madness, yet there is
method in ‘t.

Hamlet
Slanders,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 210

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Figures of Speech:
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Worthy Cominius, speak

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Menenius
Worthy Cominius, speak.
 Coriolanus rises and offers to go away.
Nay, keep your place.
First Senator
Sit, Coriolanus. Never shame to hear
What you have nobly done.

I had rather have my wounds to heal again
Than hear say how I got them.

Coriolanus
Your Honors,
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Would not my lords return to me again

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King John
Would not my lords return to me again
After they heard young Arthur was alive?
Bastard
They found him dead and cast into the streets,
An empty casket where the jewel of life
By some damned hand was robbed and ta'en away.
King John
That villain Hubert told me he did live!
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line 38

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Wrath-kindled gentlemen, be ruled by me

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King Richard
Wrath-kindled gentlemen, be ruled by me.
Let’s purge this choler without letting blood.
This we prescribe, though no physician.
Deep malice makes too deep incision.

Forget, forgive; conclude and be agreed.
Our doctors say this is no month to bleed.

Forget, forgive; conclude and be agreed.
Our doctors say this is no month to bleed.—
Good uncle,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 156

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Yea, bloody cloth, I'll keep thee

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Yea, bloody cloth, I'll keep thee, for I wish'd
Thou shouldst be color'd thus. You married ones,
If each of you should take this course, how many
Must murder wives much better than themselves
For wrying but a little! O Pisanio,
Every good servant does not all commands;
No bond, but to do just ones. Gods, if you
Should have ta'en vengeance on my faults,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line 1

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Yet better thus, and known to be contemned

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Edgar
Yet better thus, and known to be contemned,
Than still contemned and flattered. To be worst,
The lowest and most dejected thing of Fortune,
Stands still in esperance, lives not in fear.
The lamentable change is from the best;
The worst returns to laughter. Welcome, then,
Thou unsubstantial air that I embrace.
The wretch that thou hast blown unto the worst
Owes nothing to thy blasts.
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 1

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Yet show some pity

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Isabella
Yet show some pity.
Angelo 
I show it most of all when I show justice,
For then I pity those I do not know,
Which a dismissed offense would after gall,
And do him right that, answering one foul wrong,
Lives not to act another. Be satisfied;
Your brother dies tomorrow; be content.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 127

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You and Thee

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In Henry IV Part 1, in the exchange between Hotspur and Owen Glendower, about calling up devils from the vasty deep, Hotspur deliberately shifts from the word you to thee when he addresses Glendower. You was often used to convey respect while thee was used when speaking to someone of inferior rank,
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You are a thousand times a properer man

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You are a thousand times a properer man
Than she a woman. ‘Tis such fools as you
That makes the world full of ill-favor'd children.
‘Tis not her glass, but you that flatters her,
And out of you she sees herself more proper
Than any of her lineaments can show her.
But, mistress, know yourself, down on your knees,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 5
Line 51

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You are dull, Casca

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You are dull, Casca; and those sparks of life
That should be in a Roman you do want,
Or else you use not. You look pale, and gaze,
And put on fear, and cast yourself in wonder,Polysyndeton

To see the strange impatience of the heavens;
But if you would consider the true cause
Why all these fires,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 60

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You are sent for to the Capitol

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You are sent for to the Capitol. ‘Tis thought
That Martius shall be consul.
I have seen the dumb men throng to see him, and
The blind to hear him speak. Matrons flung gloves,
Ladies and maids their scarfs and handkerchers,
Upon him as he pass'd; the nobles bended,
As to Jove's statue, and the commons made
A shower and thunder with their caps and shouts.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 292

Source Type:

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You are well encountered here

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John of Lancaster
You are well encountered here, my cousin Mowbray.—
Good day to you, gentle Lord Archbishop,—
And so to you, Lord Hastings, and to all.—
My Lord of York, it better showed with you
When that your flock, assembled by the bell,
Encircled you to hear with reverence
Your exposition on the holy text
Than now to see you here,
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 242

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You bear a gentle mind, and heav’nly blessings

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Chamberlain
You bear a gentle mindSynecdoche, and heav’nly blessings
Follow such creatures. That you may, fair lady,
Perceive I speak sincerely, and high note’s
Ta’en of your many virtues, the King’s Majesty
Commends his good opinion of you to you, and
Does purpose honor to youAnthimeria no less flowing
Than Marchioness of Pembroke,
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You break jests as braggards do their blades

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You break jests as braggards do their bladesSimili, which, God be thank'd, hurt not.
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 1

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You common cry of curs

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You common cry of curs, Anaphorawhose breath I hate
SimileAs reek a' th' rotten fens, whose loves I prize
SimileAs the dead carcasses of unburied men
That do corrupt my airAlliteration & Metaphor
—I banish you!

For you, the city,
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You elves of hills, brooks, standing lakes, and groves

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Prospero draws a large circle on the stage with his staff.

 

Prospero
You elves of hills, brooks, standing lakes, and groves,
And you that on the sands with printless foot
Do chase the ebbing Neptune, and do fly him
When he comes back; you demi-puppets that
By moonshine do the green sour ringlets make,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line 42

Source Type:
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Spoken by:
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You have been a scourge to her enemies

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Fourth Roman Citizen
You have been a scourge to her enemies, you have been a rod to her friends; you have not indeed lov'd the common people.Anaphora
Coriolanus
You should account me the more virtuous that I have not been common in my love. I will, sir, flatter my sworn brother, the people,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 3
Line 100

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You have broken The article of your oath

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Caesar
You have broken
The article of your oath, which you shall never
Have tongue to charge me with.
Lepidus
Soft, Caesar!
Antony
No, Lepidus, let him speak.
The honor is sacred which he talks on now,
Supposing that I lacked it.—But on, Caesar:
The article of my oath?
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 98

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You have done well by water

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Enobarbus
You have done well by water.
Menas
And you by land.
Enobarbus
I will praise any man that will praise me,
though it cannot be denied what I have done by land.
Menas
Nor what I have done by water.
Enobarbus
Yes, something you can deny for your own
safety: you have been a great thief by sea.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 6
Line 113

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