quotes, notes, timelines & more

Home » Shakespeare’s Works » Search & Filter Quotes and Notes

Search & Filter Quotes and Notes

Displaying: 1320 Results

Why, sir, give the gods a thankful sacrifice

Read the Quote

Enobarbus
Why, sir, give the gods a thankful sacrifice.
When it pleaseth their deities to take the wife of a
man from him, it shows to man the tailors of the
Earth; comforting therein, that when old robes are
worn out, there are members to make new. If there
were no more women but Fulvia, then had you
indeed a cut,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 192

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Why, there's no remedy

Read the Quote

Iago
Why, there's no remedy. ‘Tis the curse of service.
Preferment goes by letter and affection,
And not by old gradation, where each second
Stood heir to th' first. Now, sir, be judge yourself
Whether I in any just term am affined
To love the Moor.
Roderigo
I would not follow him, then.
… continue reading this quote

Why, whither shall we go?

Read the Quote

Rosalind
Why, whither shall we go?
Celia 
To seek my uncle in the Forest of Arden.

Beauty provoketh thieves sooner than gold.

Rosalind
Alas, what danger will it be to us,
Maids as we are, to travel forth so far?
Beauty provoketh thieves sooner than gold.
Celia
I’ll put myself in poor and mean attire,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 112

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Why, whither, Adam, wouldst thou have me go?

Read the Quote

Orlando
Why, whither, Adam, wouldst thou have me go?
Adam
No matter whither, so you come not here.
Orlando
What, wouldst thou have me go and beg my food?
Or with a base and boist'rous sword enforce
A thievish living on the common road?
This I must do, or know not what to do;
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 3
Line 29

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood

Read the Quote

Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood
Clean from my hand? No, this my hand will rather
The multitudinous seas incarnadine,
Making the green one red.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 78

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Will nothing turn your unrelenting hearts?

Read the Quote

Pucelle
Will nothing turn your unrelenting hearts?
Then, Joan, discover thine infirmity,
That warranteth by law to be thy privilege:
I am with child, you bloody homicides.
Murder not then the fruit within my womb,
Although you hale me to a violent death.
York
Now heaven forfend, the holy maid with child?

May never glorious sun reflex his beams
Upon the country where you make abode,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 5
Scene 4
Line 60

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

Themes:

Will the King come, that I may breathe my last

Read the Quote

Gaunt
Will the King come, that I may breathe my last
In wholesome counsel to his unstaid youth?
York
Vex not yourself nor strive not with your breath,
For all in vain comes counsel to his ear.

This blessèd plot, this earth, this realm, this England,
This nurse, this teeming womb of royal kings,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:

Will you speak well of him that killed your cousin?

Read the Quote

Nurse
Will you speak well of him that killed your cousin?
Juliet
Shall I speak ill of him that is my husband?
Ah, poor my lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name
When I, thy three-hours wife, have mangled it?
But wherefore, villain, didst thou kill my cousin?
That villain cousin would have killed my husband.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 105

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
,

Will you walk in, my lord?

Read the Quote

Cressida
Will you walk in, my lord?
Troilus
O Cressid, how often have I wished me thus!
Cressida
“Wished,” my lord? The gods grant—O, my lord!
Troilus
What should they grant? What makes this
pretty abruption? What too-curious dreg espies
my sweet lady in the fountain of our love?
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 61

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Will you, Orlando, have to wife this Rosalind?

Read the Quote

Celia
Will you, Orlando, have to wife this Rosalind?
Orlando
I will.
Rosalind, as Ganymede
Ay, but when?
Orlando
Why now, as fast as she can marry us.

Make the doors upon a woman’s wit, and it will out
at the casement. Shut that,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 136

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

Wilt thou aspire to guide the heavenly car

Read the Quote

Wilt thou aspire to guide the heavenly car,
And with thy daring folly burn the world?
Wilt thou reach stars, because they shine on thee?
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 3
Scene 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Wilt thou be lord of all the world?

Read the Quote

Menas, aside to Pompey
Wilt thou be lord of all the world?
Pompey
What sayst thou?
Menas
Wilt thou be lord of the whole world? That's twice.
Pompey
How should that be?
Menas
But entertain it,
And though thou think me poor,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 7
Line 69

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Wilt thou lay hands on me, villain?

Read the Quote

Oliver
Wilt thou lay hands on me, villain?
Orlando
I am no villain. I am the youngest son of Sir
Rowland de Boys. He was my father, and he is
thrice a villain that says such a father begot villains.
Wert thou not my brother, I would not take this
hand from thy throat till this other had pulled out
thy tongue for saying so.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 55

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

With a proud heart he wore his humble weeds

Read the Quote

With a proud heart he wore his humble weeds.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 3
Line 169

Source Type:

Spoken by:

With trial-fire touch me his finger-end

Read the Quote

Mistress Quickly, as Fairy Queen, to Sir Hugh
With trial-fire touch me his finger-end.
If he be chaste, the flame will back descend
And turn him to no pain. But if he start,
It is the flesh of a corrupted heart.
Pistol, as Hobgoblin
A trial, come!
Sir Hugh,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 89

Source Type:
,

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

Within the Temple Hall we were too loud

Read the Quote

Suffolk
Within the Temple Hall we were too loud;
The garden here is more convenient.
Plantagenet

Then say at once if I maintained the truth,
Or else was wrangling Somerset in th’ error?
Suffolk
Faith, I have been a truant in the law
And never yet could frame my will to it,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 4
Line 3

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, , ,

Wives and Troubled Husbands

Read the Note

Lady Percy's plea to Hotspur in Henry IV, Part 1, is similar to Portia's plea to Brutus in Julius Caesar. In both a wife is pleading with her husband to disclose the thoughts that seem to trouble him deeply. A difference, however, is that some psychologists consider Lady Percy's speech a clinical description of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.
… continue reading this note

This Note references:
Source(s):
,
Character(s):
,
Themes:

Woe the while!

Read the Quote

Paulina
Woe the while!
O, cut my lace, lest my heart, cracking it,
Break too!
Lord
What fit is this, good lady?
Paulina, to Leontes
What studied torments, tyrant, hast for me?
What wheels, racks, fires? What flaying? Boiling
In leads or oils? What old or newer torture
Must I receive, whose every word deserves
To taste of thy most worst?
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 190

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

Women will love her, that she is a woman

Read the Quote

Women will love her, that she is a woman
More worth than any man; men, that she is
The rarest of all womenEllipsis

… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 5
Scene 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:

Figures of Speech:

Words, words, words

Read the Quote

Hamlet
Words, words, words.Epizeuxis
Polonius
What is the matter, my lord?
Hamlet
Between who?
Polonius
I mean the matter Antanaclesis
that you read, my lord.

Though this be madness, yet there is
method in ‘t.

Hamlet
Slanders,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 210

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , ,