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An ’t please your Grace, the two great cardinals

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Gentleman
An ’t please your Grace, the two great cardinals
Wait in the presence.
Queen Katherine
Would they speak with me?
Gentleman
They willed me say so, madam.

I do not like their coming, now I think on ’t.
They should be good men, their affairs as righteous.
But all hoods make not monks.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 28

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

An untimely ague Stayed me a prisoner in my chamber

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Buckingham
An untimely ague
Stayed me a prisoner in my chamber when
Those suns of glory, those two lights of men,Anaphora, Pun & Metaphor
Met in the vale of Andren.
Norfolk
’Twixt Guynes and Arde.
I was then present, saw them salute on horseback,
Beheld them when they lighted,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 2

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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Themes:

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , ,

Connected Notes:
Fire and Gold

And here is my speech

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Falstaff
And here is my speech.  As King.  Stand
aside, nobility.
Hostess
O Jesu, this is excellent sport, i' faith!
Falstaff, as King
Weep not, sweet queen, for trickling tears are vain.
Hostess
O the Father, how he holds his countenance!
Falstaff,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 4
Line 401

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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And how doth thy master, Bardolph?

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Prince Hal
And how doth thy master, Bardolph?
Bardolph
Well, my good lord. He heard of your
Grace’s coming to town. There’s a letter for you.
 He gives the Prince a paper.
Poins
Delivered with good respect. And how doth the
Martlemas your master?
Bardolph
In bodily health,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 96

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And how like you this shepherd's life, Master Touchstone?

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Corin
And how like you this shepherd's life, Master Touchstone?
Touchstone
Truly, shepherd, in respect of itself, it is a good life; but in respect that it is a shepherd's life, it is naught. In respect that it is solitary, I like it very well; but in respect that it is private, it is a very vild life.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 11

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

And humbly now upon my bended knee

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Suffolk
And humbly now upon my bended knee,
In sight of England and her lordly peers,
Deliver up my title in the Queen
To your most gracious hands, that are the substance
Of that great shadow I did represent:
The happiest gift that ever marquess gave,
The fairest queen that ever king received.

Her sight did ravish,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 12

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Spoken by:
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Themes:

And humbly now upon my bended knee

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And humbly now upon my bended knee,
In sight of England and her lordly peers,
Deliver up my title in the Queen
To your most gracious hands, that are the substance
Of that great shadow I did represent:
The happiest gift that ever marquess gave,
The fairest queen that ever king received.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 13

Source Type:

Spoken by:

And I forsooth in love!

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And I forsooth in love! I that have been love's whip,
A very beadle to a humorous sigh,
A critic, nay, a nightwatch constable,
A domineering pedant o'er the boy,
Than whom no mortal so magnificent.
This wimpled, whining, purblind, wayward boy,
This Signior Junior, giant dwarf, Dan Cupid,
Regent of love rhymes, lord of folded arms,
Th' anointed sovereign of sighs and groans,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 184

Source Type:

Spoken by:

And if it stand, as you yourself still do

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And if it stand, as you yourself still do,
Within the eye of honor, be assured
My purse, my person, my extremest meansAnaphora
Lie all unlocked to your occasions.Alliteration
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 143

Source Type:

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Figures of Speech:
,

And is it true that I must go from Troy?

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Cressida
And is it true that I must go from Troy?
Troilus
A hateful truth.
Cressida
What, and from Troilus too?
Troilus
From Troy and Troilus.
Cressida
Is ‘t possible?

We two, that with so many thousand sighs
Did buy each other, must poorly sell ourselves
With the rude brevity and discharge of one.
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 4
Line 30

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
, ,

And is the bride and bridegroom coming home?

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Tranio, as Lucentio
And is the bride and bridegroom coming home?
Gremio
A bridegroom, say you? ’Tis a groom indeed,
A grumbling groom, and that the girl shall find.
Tranio, as Lucentio
Curster than she? Why, ’tis impossible.
Gremio
Why, he’s a devil,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 153

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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And it is marvel he outdwells his hour

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Gratiano
And it is marvel he outdwells his hour,
For lovers ever run before the clock.
Salarino
O, ten times faster Venus' pigeons fly
To seal love's bonds new-made than they are wont
To keep obligèd faith unforfeited.
Gratiano
That ever holds. Who riseth from a feast
With that keen appetite that he sits down?
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 6
Line 4

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

And let us swear our resolution

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Cassius
And let us swear our resolution.
Marcus Brutus
No, not an oath!Anapodoton If not the face of men,
The sufferance of our souls, the time's abuseIsocolon

If these be motives weakAnastrophe, break off betimes,
And every man hence to his idle bed;
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 124

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
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And let us, Polydore, though now our voices

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Arviragus
And let us, Polydore, though now our voices
Have got the mannish crack, sing him to th' ground,
As once to our mother; use like note and words,
Save that Euriphile must be Fidele.
Guiderius
Cadwal,
I cannot sing. I'll weep, and word it with thee;
For notes of sorrow out of tune are worse
Than priests and fanes that lie.
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 2
Line 237

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

And may it be that you have quite forgot

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And may it be that you have quite forgot
A husband's office? Shall, Antipholus,
Even in the spring of love thy love-springs rot?
Shall love, in building,  grow so ruinous?
If you did wed my sister for her wealth,
Then for her wealth's sake use her with more kindness.
Or if you like elsewhere, do it by stealth —
Muffle your false love with some show of blindness.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:

And my poor fool is hanged

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King Lear
And my poor fool is hanged. No, no, no life?
Why should a dog, a horse, a rat have life,
And thou no breath at all? Thou ‘lt come no more,
Never, never, never, never, never.—
Pray you undo this button. Thank you, sir.
Do you see this? Look on her, look, her lips,
Look there,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 3
Line 369

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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And now, Laertes, what’s the news with you?

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King Claudius
And now, Laertes, what’s the news with you?
You told us of some suit. What is ’t, Laertes?
You cannot speak of reason to the Dane
And lose your voice. What wouldst thou beg, Laertes,
That shall not be my offer, not thy asking?
The head is not more native to the heart,
The hand more instrumental to the mouth,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 42

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Figures of Speech:

Connected Notes:
Hamlet's First Words

And so we’ll leave you to your meditations

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Norfolk
And so we’ll leave you to your meditations
How to live better. For your stubborn answer
About the giving back the great seal to us,
The King shall know it and, no doubt, shall thank you.
So, fare you well, my little good Lord Cardinal.

I have ventured,
Like little wanton boys that swim on bladders,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 413

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

And tell me now, sweet friend, what happy gale Blows you to Padua

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Hortensio
And tell me now, sweet friend, what happy gale
Blows you to Padua here from old Verona?
Petruchio
Such wind as scatters young men through the world
To seek their fortunes farther than at home,
Where small experience grows. But in a few,
Signior Hortensio, thus it stands with me:
Antonio, my father,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 48

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

And tell me, noble Diomed, faith, tell me true

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Paris
And tell me, noble Diomed, faith, tell me true,
Even in the soul of sound good-fellowship,
Who, in your thoughts, deserves fair Helen best,
Myself or Menelaus?
Diomedes
Both alike.
He merits well to have her that doth seek her,
Not making any scruple of her soilure,
With such a hell of pain and world of charge;
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 2
Line 56

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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