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A Plague and a Scourge

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Mercutio's curse, “A plague o' both your houses!” is fulfilled, although not literally. Despite the numerous ways scores of characters die in Shakespeare's plays, no one in this play or any other Shakespeare play dies of the plague. But the plague is the proximate cause of Romeo's and Juliet's deaths.  When Friar Lawrence sends Friar John to deliver a letter to Romeo telling him of Juliet's fake death,
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A right fair mark, fair coz, is soonest hit

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Benvolio
A right fair mark, fair coz, is soonest hit.
Romeo
Well in that hit you miss. She'll not be hit
With Cupid's arrow. She hath Dian's wit,
And, in strong proof of chastity well armed,
From love's weak childish bow she lives uncharmed.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 215

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A sentence is but a chev'ril glove

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A sentence is but a chev'ril glove to a good wit. How quickly the wrong side may be turn'd outward!
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2

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A true-devoted pilgrim is not weary

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Julia 
A true-devoted pilgrim is not weary
To measure kingdoms with his feeble steps;
Much less shall she that hath Love’s wings to fly,
And when the flight is made to one so dear,
Of such divine perfection, as Sir Proteus.

Didst thou but know the inly touch of love,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 7
Line 9

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A woeful Cressid ‘mongst the merry Greeks

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Cressida
A woeful Cressid ‘mongst the merry Greeks.
When shall we see again?
Troilus
Hear me, my  love. Be thou but true of heart—
Cressida
I true? How now, what wicked deem is this?
Troilus
Nay, we must use expostulation kindly,
For it is parting from us.
I speak not “Be thou true”
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 4
Line 59

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A woman of quick sense

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Nestor
A woman of quick sense.
Ulysses
Fie, fie upon her!
There's language in her eye, her cheek, her lip;
Nay, her foot speaks. Her wanton spirits look out
At every joint and motive of her body.
O, these encounterers, so glib of tongue,
That give accosting welcome ere it comes
And wide unclasp the tables of their thoughts
To every tickling reader!
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 5
Line 63

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A word, Lucilius, How he receiv'd you; let me be resolv'd

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Marcus Brutus
A word, Lucilius,
How he receiv'd you; let me be resolv'd.
Lucilius
With courtesy and with respect enough,
But not with such familiar instances,
Nor with such free and friendly conference,
As he hath us'd of old.

When love begins to sicken and decay
It useth an enforced ceremony.
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 2
Line 15

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Accurs'd, unhappy, wretched, hateful day!

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Accurs'd, unhappy, wretched, hateful day!Check This
Most miserable hour that e'er time saw
In lasting labor of his pilgrimage!Metaphor

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Source:
Act 4
Scene 5
Line 49

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Achilles stands i' th' entrance of his tent

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Ulysses
Achilles stands i' th' entrance of his tent.
Please it our General pass strangely by him
As if he were forgot, and, princes all,
Lay negligent and loose regard upon him.
I will come last. ‘Tis like he'll question me
Why such unplausive eyes are bent, why turned on him.
If so, I have derision medicinable
To use between your strangeness and his pride,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 3
Line 39

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Achilles will not to the field tomorrow

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Ulysses
Achilles will not to the field tomorrow.
Agamemnon
What's his excuse?
Ulysses
He doth rely on none,
But carries on the stream of his dispose,
Without observance or respect of any,
In will peculiar and in self-admission.
Agamemnon
Why, will he not, upon our fair request,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 3
Line 169

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Adieu, adieu, adieu. Remember me

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Ghost
Adieu, adieu, adieu.Epizeuxis Remember me.
 He exits.
Hamlet
O all you host of heaven! O Earth!Anapodotons & Apostrophes What else?
And shall I couple hell?Pysma
O fie! Hold, hold, my heart,
And you, my sinews, grow not instant old,

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Adieu, uncle

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Cressida
Adieu, uncle.
Pandarus
I will be with you, niece, by and by.
Cressida
To bring, uncle?
Pandarus
Ay, a token from Troilus.
Cressida
By the same token, you are a bawd.
Pandarus exits.
Words, vows, gifts, tears, and love's full sacrifice
He offers in another's enterprise;
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 284

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Admit no other way to save his life

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Angelo
Admit no other way to save his life—
As I subscribe not that, nor any other—
But, in the loss of question, that you, his sister,
Finding yourself desired of such a person
Whose credit with the judge, or own great place,
Could fetch your brother from Metaphorthe manacles
Of the binding law,

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Age cannot wither her

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Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale
Her infinite variety. Other women cloy
The appetites they feed, but she makes hungry
Where most she satisfies. For vilest things
Become themselves in her, that the holy priests
Bless her when she is riggish.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 276

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Ah ha, my lord, this prince is not an Edward!

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Buckingham
Ah ha, my lord, this prince is not an Edward!
He is not lolling on a lewd love-bed,
But on his knees at meditation;
Not dallying with a brace of courtesans,
But meditating with two deep divines;
Not sleeping, to engross his idle body,
But praying, to enrich his watchful soul.
Happy were England would this virtuous prince
Take on his Grace the sovereignty thereof.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 7
Line 72

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Ah, Lucius, for thy brothers let me plead

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Titus Andronicus
Ah, Lucius, for thy brothers let me plead.—
Grave tribunes, once more I entreat of you—
Lucius
My gracious lord, no tribune hears you speak.
Titus Andronicus
Why, 'tis no matter, man. If they did hear,
They would not mark me; if they did mark,
They would not pity me.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 30

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Alack, 'tis he! Why, he was met even now

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Cordelia
Alack, 'tis he! Why, he was met even now
As mad as the vexed sea, singing aloud,
Crowned with rank fumiter and furrow-weeds,
With hardocks, hemlock, nettles, cuckooflowers,
Darnel, and all the idle weeds that grow
In our sustaining corn. A century send forth.
Search every acre in the high-grown field
And bring him to our eye.
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 4
Line 1

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Alack, our terrene moon is now eclipsed

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Antony
Alack, our terrene moon is now eclipsed,
And it portends alone the fall of Antony.
Cleopatra
I must stay his time.
Antony
To flatter Caesar, would you mingle eyes
With one that ties his points?
Cleopatra
Not know me yet?
Antony
Coldhearted toward me?
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 13
Line 188

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Alas, Iago, What shall I do to win my lord again?

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Desdemona
Alas, Iago,
What shall I do to win my lord again?
Good friend, go to him. For by this light of heaven,
I know not how I lost him.  She kneels.   Here I kneel.
If e'er my will did trespass ‘gainst his love,
Either in discourse of thought or actual deed,
Or that mine eyes,
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 2
Line 175

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Alas, my lord, Your wisdom is consum'd in confidence

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Calphurnia
Alas, my lord,
Your wisdom is consum'd in confidence.
Do not go forth today; call it my fear
That keeps you in the house, and not your own.
We'll send Mark Antony to the Senate-house,
And he shall say you are not well today.
Let me, upon my knee, prevail in this.
Julius Caesar
Mark Antony shall say I am not well,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 52

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