quotes, notes, timelines & more

Home » Shakespeare's Works » Elements » Figures of Speech » Figures of Speech by Name » Page 3

Simile

Troy, yet upon his basis, had been down

Read the Quote

Troy, yet upon his basis, had been down,
And the great Hector’s sword had lacked a masterMetonymy
But for these instances:
The specialty of rule hath been neglected,
And look how many Grecian tents do stand
Hollow upon this plain, so many hollow factions.
When that the general is not like the hive
To whom the foragers shall all repair,

… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 79

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
, , ,

Figures of Speech:
,

Connected Notes:
Iago and Ulysses on Order and Degree

The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose

Read the Quote

The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.
An evil soul producing holy witness
Is like a villain with a smiling cheek,
A goodly apple rotten at the heart.Simile

O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath!Personification
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 106

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Figures of Speech:
,

Signior Antonio, many a time and oft

Read the Quote

Shylock
Signior Antonio, many a time and oftHendiadys
In the Rialto you have rated me
About my moneys and my usances.
Still have I borne it with a patient shrug
(For suff’rance is the badge of all our tribe).
You call me misbeliever, cutthroat dog,
And spet upon my Jewish gaberdine,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 116

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , ,

Connected Notes:
Christians and Jews

O, he sits high in all the people’s hearts

Read the Quote

O, he sits high in all the people’s hearts;
And that which would appear offense in us,
His countenance, like richest alchemy,Simile
Will change to virtue and to worthiness.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 162

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:

Figures of Speech:

O worthiest cousin, The sin of my ingratitude

Read the Quote

Duncan
O worthiest cousin,
The sin of my ingratitude even now
Was heavy on me. Thou art so far before
That swiftest wing of recompense is slow
To overtake thee. Would thou hadst less deserved,Metaphor

That the proportion both of thanks and payment
Might have been mine! Only I have left to say,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 4
Line 17

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , ,

She-wolf of France, but worse than wolves of France

Read the Quote

She-wolf of France, but worse than wolves of France,
Whose Synecdochetongue more poisons than the adder’s tooth:Metaphor, Diacope & Parenthesis

How ill-beseeming is it in thy sex
To triumph like an Amazonian trull
Upon their woes whom Fortune captivates.Simile

O, tiger’s heart wrapped in a woman’s hide,
… continue reading this quote

O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!

Read the Quote

O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!
It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night
As a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear—Simili

Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!
So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows,
As yonder lady o’er her fellows shows.Simili

The measure done,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 5
Line 51

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:

Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile

Read the Quote

Duke Senior
Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile,
Hath not old custom made this life more sweet
Than that of Alliterationpainted pomp? Are not these woods
More free from peril than the envious court?Pysma

Here feel we not the penalty of Adam,
The seasons’ difference,

… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , ,

Connected Notes:
Town and Country

It must be by his death

Read the Quote

It must be by his death; and for my part,
I know no personal cause to spurn at him,
But for the general. He would be crown’d:
How that might change his nature, there’s the question.
It is the bright day that brings forth the adder,
And that craves wary walking. Crown him that,
And then I grant we put a sting in him
That at his will he may do danger with.

… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 10

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
,

Since Cassius first did whet me against Caesar

Read the Quote

Since Cassius first did whet me against Caesar,
I have not slept.
Between the acting of a dreadful thing
And the first motion, all the interim is
Like a phantasma or a hideous dream.Simile

The Genius and the mortal instruments
Are then in council;Metaphor & Personification
and the state of a man,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 64

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Figures of Speech:
, ,