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Simile

Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing

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Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice.Adynaton His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff: you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search.Simile
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 121

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Figures of Speech:
,

This butcher’s cur is venomed-mouthed

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Buckingham
This butcher’s cur is venomed-mouthed, and I
Have not the power to muzzle him; therefore best
Not wake him in his slumber. A beggar’s book
Outworths a noble’s blood.Metaphors

Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot
That it do singe yourself.

Norfolk
What,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 143

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,

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , , ,

It was about to speak when the cock crew

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Barnardo
It was about to speak when the cock crew.
Horatio
And then it started like a guilty thing
Upon a fearful summons.Simile
I have heard
The cock, that is the trumpet to the mornMetaphor,
Doth with his lofty and shrill-sounding throat
Awake the god of day,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 162

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, , ,

Figures of Speech:
, , ,

Connected Notes:
Seasons, Elements and Humors, Birds — Martial and Marital

What’s the matter, you dissentious rogues

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What’s the matter, you dissentious rogues,
That rubbing the poor itch of your opinion
Make yourselves scabsMetaphor
?…
He that will give good words to thee will flatter
Beneath abhorring. What would you have, you curs,
That like nor peace nor war? The one affrights you,
The other makes you proud. He that trusts to you,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 174

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, ,

Connected Notes:
Pandering, Contempt and the Masses

Say not “treasonous.”

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Norfolk
Say not “treasonous.”
Buckingham
To th’ King I’ll say ’t, and make my vouch as strong
As shore of rock.Hyperbaton & Simile

This holy fox,
Or wolf, or both—for he is equal rav’nous
As he is subtle, and as prone to mischief
As able to perform ’t

Attend.
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Farewell till then. I will go lose myself

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Antipholus of Syracuse
Farewell till then. I will go lose myself
And wander up and down to view the city.
First Merchant
Sir, I commend you to your own content.
 He exits.

I to the world am like a drop of water,
That in the ocean seeks another drop

Antipholus of Syracuse
He that commends me to mine own content,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 33

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, ,

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
,

Connected Notes:
Love and Water

Why, how now, Claudio? Whence comes this restraint?

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Lucio
Why, how now, Claudio? Whence comes this
restraint?
Claudio
From too much liberty, my Lucio, liberty.
As surfeit is the father of much fast,Simile
So every scope by the immoderate use
Turns to restraint. Our natures do pursue,
Like rats that raven down their proper bane,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 120

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Figures of Speech:
,

I am sorry that the Duke of Buckingham Is run in your displeasure

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Queen Katherine, to the King
I am sorry that the Duke of Buckingham
Is run in your displeasure.

When these so noble benefits shall prove
Not well disposed, the mind growing once corrupt,
They turn to vicious forms ten times more ugly
Than ever they were fair.

King
It grieves many.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 125

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Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world

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Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Like a Colossus, and we petty men
Walk under his huge legs, and peep about
To find ourselves dishonorable graves.Adynaton & Simile

The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves, that we are underlings.

Men at some time are masters of their fates;
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For Hamlet, and the trifling of his favor,

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Laertes
For Hamlet, and the trifling of his favor,
Hold it a fashion and a toy in blood,Hendiadys & Synecdoche
A violet in the youth of primy nature,Metaphor
Forward, not permanent, sweet, not lasting,
Hendiadys & MetaphorThe perfume and suppliance of a minute,

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