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Mesodiplosis

Mesodiplosis (mes-o-dip-lo'-sis) is the repetition of the same word or words in the middle of successive sentences or phrases. “But till that time / Come not thou near me. / And when that time comes, \ Afflict me with thy mocks, pity me not, / As till that time I shall not pity thee.” As You Like It, 3.5.39. See also anaphora, the repetition of words at the beginnings, and epistrophe, the repetition of words at the end.

Mesodiplosis is an example of:
Repetition

O dear Phoebe

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Silvius
O dear Phoebe,
If ever—as that ever may be near—
You meet in some fresh cheek the power of fancy,Synecdoche
Then shall you know the wounds invisible
That love’s keen arrows make.Metaphor & Anastrophe

Phoebe
But till that time
Come not thou near me.

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Source:
Act 3
Scene 5
Line 39

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

Figures of Speech:
, , , ,

Yea, marry, let them come before me

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Dogberry
Yea, marry, let them come before me.
  Conrade and Borachio are brought forward.
What is your name, friend?
Borachio
Borachio.
Dogberry
Pray, write down “Borachio.”—Yours, sirrah?
Conrade
I am a gentleman, sir, and my name is Conrade.

O, villain! Thou wilt be condemned
into everlasting redemption for this!
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 2
Line 10

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, , , , , ,

Figures of Speech:
, , , ,

Come, cousin Angelo, In this I’ll be impartial

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Duke
Come, cousin Angelo,
In this I’ll be impartial. Be you judge
Of your own cause.  Duke and Angelo are seated.
 Enter Mariana, veiled.
Is this the witness, friar?
First, let her show her face, and after speak.
Mariana
Pardon, my lord, I will not show my face
Until my husband bid me.
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