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Hypophora

Hypophora (hy-po'-phor-a) is the raising of a question that the writer or speaker immediately answers. Hypophora is sometimes call rogatio.  (See also pysma, which is a series of successive questions, sometimes but not always rhetorical.) “What is honor? A word. What is in that word “honor”? What is that “honor”? Air. A trim reckoning.” Henry IV Pt 2, 5.1.122

Characters, Actors and Figurative Language

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Early in Henry VIII, Anne Bullen, young and beautiful, considers the prospect of a prosperous future. In the same scene, Anne’s companion, the old lady, sardonically remarks on her lost youth and unfulfilled aspirations for wealth and position at court. The contrast of these two characters is clear, but Shakespeare uses more than casting, makeup, costumes, or even the subject matter of their opening dialogue,
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She-wolf of France, but worse than wolves of France

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She-wolf of France, but worse than wolves of France,
Whose Synecdochetongue more poisons than the adder’s tooth:Metaphor, Diacope & Parenthesis

How ill-beseeming is it in thy sex
To triumph like an Amazonian trull
Upon their woes whom Fortune captivates.Simile

O, tiger’s heart wrapped in a woman’s hide,
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You bear a gentle mind, and heav’nly blessings

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Chamberlain
You bear a gentle mindSynecdoche, and heav’nly blessings
Follow such creatures. That you may, fair lady,
Perceive I speak sincerely, and high note’s
Ta’en of your many virtues, the King’s Majesty
Commends his good opinion of you to you, and
Does purpose honor to youAnthimeria no less flowing
Than Marchioness of Pembroke,
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Some god direct my judgment!

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Some god direct my judgment! Let me see.
I will survey th’ inscriptions back again.
What says this leaden casket?
“Who chooseth me must give and hazard all he hath.”Hypophora

Must give—for what? For lead? Hazard for lead?
This casket threatens. Men that hazard all
Do it in hope of fair advantages.

Why,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 7
Line 4

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Romans, countrymen, and lovers

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Marcus Brutus
Romans, countrymen, and lovers,Exordium hear me for my
cause, and be silent, that you may hear. Believe me
for mine honor, and have respect to mine honor
that you may believe. Censure me in your wisdom,
and awake your senses, that you may the better judge.Epanalepses & Isocolon

There is tears for his love;
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Hal, if thou see me down in the battle

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Falstaff
Hal, if thou see me down in the battle and
bestride me, so; ’tis a point of friendship.
Prince Hal
Nothing but a colossus can do thee that friendship.
Say thy prayers, and farewell.
Falstaff
I would ’twere bedtime, Hal, and all well.

What is honor? A word. What is in that word “honor”?
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line 122

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,

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Characters, Actors and Figurative Language

Come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me

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King 
Come, Hamlet, come and take this hand from me.
He puts Laertes’ hand into Hamlet’s.
Hamlet, to Laertes  
Give me your pardon, sir. I have done you wrong;
But pardon ’t as you are a gentleman. This presence knows,
And you must needs have heard, how I am punished
With a sore distraction.
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 2
Line 239

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Give me another horse!

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Give me another horse! Bind up my wounds!
Have mercy, Jesu!—Soft, I did but dream.
O coward conscience, how dost thou afflict me!Apostrophe & Alliteration
The lights burn blue; it is now dead midnight.
Cold fearful drops stand on my trembling flesh.Transferred Epithet
What do I fear? Myself? There’s none else by.
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