quotes, notes, timelines & more

Home » Shakespeare's Works » Elements » Figures of Speech » Figures of Speech by Name » Epanalepsis

Epanalepsis

Epanalepsis is the repetition at the end of a clause of the word that occurred at the beginning of the clause. Repetition of words after intervening words for emphasis, or the repetition of words at beginning and end of line, phrase, clause, or sentence. “Romans, countrymen, and lovers, hear me for my cause, and be silent, that you may hear. Believe me for mine honor, and have respect to mine honor, that you may believe.” Julius Caesar, 3.2.14

Epanalepsis is an example of:
Repetition

Tush, never tell me! I take it much unkindly

Read the Quote

Roderigo
Tush, never tell me! I take it much unkindly
That thou, Iago, who hast had my purse
As if the strings were thine, shouldst know of this.
Iago
’Sblood, but you’ll not hear me!
If ever I did dream of such a matter,
Abhor me.
Roderigo
Thou toldst me thou didst hold him in thy hate.
… continue reading this quote

By my troth, Nerissa, my little body is aweary of this great world

Read the Quote

Portia
By my troth, Nerissa, my little body is aweary
of this great world.
Nerissa
You would be, sweet madam, if your miseries
were in the same abundance as your good fortunes
are. And yet, for aught I see, they are as sick that
surfeit with too much as they that starve with
nothing.

… continue reading this quote

If the Duke, with the other dukes, come not to composition with the King of Hungary

Read the Quote

Lucio
If the Duke, with the other dukes, come not to
composition with the King of Hungary, why then all
the dukes fall upon the King.
First Gentleman
Heaven grant us its peace, but not
the King of Hungary’s!Paronomasia

Grace is grace, despite of all
controversy; as,
… continue reading this quote

O that this too too solid flesh would melt

Read the Quote

O, that this too too sullied flesh would melt,
Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew!Epizeuxis & Metaphor

Or that the Everlasting had not fix’d
His canon ‘gainst self-slaughter!Metonymy
O God, God,
How Synonymiaweary, stale, flat, and unprofitable
Seem to me all the uses of this world!

… continue reading this quote

My only love sprung from my only hate!

Read the Quote

My only love sprung from my only hate!Paradox
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!Epanalepsis
Prodigious birth of love it is to me
That I must love a loathèd enemy.Irony

… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 5
Line 152

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
, ,

When beggars die there are no comets seen

Read the Quote

Calphurnia
When beggars die there are no comets seen;
The heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes.
Julius Caesar
Cowards die many times before their deaths,
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 31

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:

Ay, ay, Antipholus, look strange and frown

Read the Quote

Ay, ay, Antipholus, look strange and frown.
Some other mistress hath thy sweet aspects.
I am not Adriana, nor thy wife.The time was onceHyperbaton when thou unurged wouldst vowAnastrophe
That never words were music to thine ear,
That never object pleasing in thine eye,
That never touch well welcome to thy hand,

… continue reading this quote

Admit no other way to save his life

Read the Quote

Angelo
Admit no other way to save his life—
As I subscribe not that, nor any other—
But, in the loss of question, that you, his sister,
Finding yourself desired of such a person
Whose credit with the judge, or own great place,
Could fetch your brother from Metonymythe manacles
Of the binding law,

… continue reading this quote

Romans, countrymen, and lovers

Read the Quote

Marcus Brutus
Romans, countrymen, and lovers,Exordium hear me for my
cause, and be silent, that you may hear. Believe me
for mine honor, and have respect to mine honor
that you may believe. Censure me in your wisdom,
and awake your senses, that you may the better judge.Epanalepses & Isocolon

There is tears for his love;
… continue reading this quote

Sir, I was an inward of his

Read the Quote

Lucio
Sir, I was an inward of his. A shy fellow was the
Duke, and I believe I know the cause of his
withdrawing.
Duke, as Friar
What, I prithee, might be the cause?
Lucio
No, pardon. ’Tis a secret must be locked within
the teeth and the lips.

… continue reading this quote