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Apposition

Apposition is the interrupting a sentence with a word or phrase to add descriptive content. “The winds did sing it to me, and the thunder, / That deep and dreadful organ pipeApposition, pronounced / The name of Prosper.” The Tempest 3.3.114. Similar to a parenthesis but appositions are less interruptive, more like clauses providing clarifying or additional information.

Apposition is an example of:
Addition

An untimely ague Stayed me a prisoner in my chamber

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Buckingham
An untimely ague
Stayed me a prisoner in my chamber when
Those suns of glory, those two lights of men,Anaphora, Pun & Metaphor
Met in the vale of Andren.
Norfolk
’Twixt Guynes and Arde.
I was then present, saw them salute on horseback,
Beheld them when they lighted,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 2

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , ,

Connected Notes:
Fire and Gold

All this was ordered by the good discretion

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Norfolk
All this was ordered by the good discretion
Of the right reverend Cardinal of York.

No man’s pie is freed
From his ambitious finger.

Buckingham
The devil speed him! No man’s pie is freed
From his ambitious finger.Metaphor
What had he
To do in these fierce vanities?
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 59

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,

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Figures of Speech:
, ,

O, where is Romeo? Saw you him today?

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Lady Montague
O, where is Romeo? Saw you him today?
Right glad I am he was not at this fray.
Benvolio
Madam, an hour before the worshiped sun
Peered forth the golden window of the east,
A troubled mind drove me to walk abroad,
Where underneath the grove of sycamore
That westward rooteth from this city side,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 118

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, ,

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, , , ,

Why, all this business Our reverend cardinal carried

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Buckingham
Why, all this business
Our reverend cardinal carried.

You know his nature,
That he’s revengeful, and I know his sword
Hath a sharp edge

Norfolk
Like it your Grace,
The state takes notice of the private difference
Betwixt you and the Cardinal. I advise you—
And take it from a heart that wishes towards you
Honor and plenteous safety—that you read
The Cardinal’s malice and his potency
TogetherParenthesis
;
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 119

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
, ,

Say not “treasonous.”

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Norfolk
Say not “treasonous.”
Buckingham
To th’ King I’ll say ’t, and make my vouch as strong
As shore of rock.Hyperbaton & Simile

This holy fox,
Or wolf, or both—for he is equal rav’nous
As he is subtle, and as prone to mischief
As able to perform ’t

Attend.
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Though yet of Hamlet our dear brother’s death

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Though yet of Hamlet our dear brother’s death
MetaphorThe memory be green, and that it us befitted
To bear our hearts in grief, and Personificationour whole kingdom
To be contracted in one brow of woe,
PersonificationYet so far hath discretion fought with nature
That we with wisest sorrow think on him
Together with remembrance of ourselves.

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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 1

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,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , , ,

What news, Sir Thomas Lovell?

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Chamberlain
What news, Sir Thomas Lovell?
Lovell
Faith, my lord,
I hear of none but the new proclamation
That’s clapped upon the court gate.

’Tis time to give ’em physic, their diseases
Are grown so catching.

Chamberlain
What is ’t for?
Lovell
The reformation of our traveled gallants
That fill the court with Bathosquarrels,

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Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 20

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, ,

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , ,

Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile

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Duke Senior
Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile,
Hath not old custom made this life more sweet
Than that of Alliterationpainted pomp? Are not these woods
More free from peril than the envious court?Pysma

Here feel we not the penalty of Adam,
The seasons’ difference,

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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 1

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Spoken by:
,

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Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , ,

Connected Notes:
Town and Country

All good people, You that thus far have come to pity me

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Buckingham
All good people,
You that thus far have come to pity me,
Hear what I say, and then go home and lose me.

Go with me like good angels to my end,
And as the long divorce of steel falls on me,
Make of your prayers one sweet sacrifice

I have this day received a traitor’s judgment,
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Not for that neither. Here’s the pang that pinches

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Anne
Not for that neither.Anapodoton Here’s the pang that pinches:
His Highness having lived so long with herAlliteration
, and she
So good a lady that no tongue could ever
Pronounce dishonor of her—Parenthesesby my life,
She never knew harm-doing!—O, now,

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