quotes, notes, timelines & more

Home » Shakespeare's Works » Elements » Figures of Speech » Figures of Speech by Name » Anastrophe

Anastrophe

Anastrophe (an-as'-tro-phee) is a type of hyperbaton in which usually only a single word is misplaced or reversed from it expected order. Most often the adjective appears after the noun when we expect to find it before the noun. “Plots have I laid, inductions dangerous, / By drunken prophecies, libels, and dreams, / To set my brother Clarence and the King / In deadly hate.” Richard III, 1.1.1.

Anastrophe is an example of:
Arrangement

Richard III and the Sonnet

Read the Note

“Now is the winter of our discontent” is nearly as familiar as Hamlet’s, “To be, or not to be” and Mark Antony’s, “Friends, Romans, countrymen”. Not one of these three passages is a dramatic dialogue. Mark Antony addresses a large Roman crowd in an extended speech. Hamlet muses to himself in a soliloquy while we the audience listen in.
… continue reading this note

How oft, when thou, my music, music play’st

Read the Sonnet

How oft, when thou, my music, music play’stAnastrophe, Antanaclasis, Epizeuxis & Metaphor
Upon that blessèd wood whose motion sounds
With thy sweet fingers when thou gently sway’st
The wiry concord that mine ear confounds,Anastrophe & Synecdoche
Do I envy those jacks that nimble leap
To kiss the tender inward of thy hand,Personification

Whilst my poor lips, which should that harvest reap,
At the wood’s boldness by thee blushing stand.Metaphor & Personification

To be so tickled they would change their state
And situation with those dancing chips,
O’er whom thy fingers walk with gentle gait,Catachresis
Making dead wood more blest than living lips.
Since saucy jacks so happy are in this,
Give them thy fingers, me thy lips to kiss.Ellipsis, Hyperbaton & Zeugma

In Troy there lies the scene

Read the Quote

Enter the Prologue in armor.

In Troy there lies the scene.Hyperbaton From isles of Greece
The princes orgulousAnastrophe, their high blood chafed,
Have to the port of Athens sent their shipsHyperbaton
Fraught with the ministers and instruments
Of cruel war. Sixty and nine,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Line Prologue

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
,

Now is the winter of our discontent

Read the Quote

NowHyperbaton is the winter of our discontentMetaphor
Made glorious summerMetaphor by this son of York,Paronomasia
And all the clouds that louredMetaphor upon our houseMetonymy
In the deep bosom of the ocean MetaphorburiedHyperbaton & Ellipsis.
… continue reading this quote

The King is full of grace and fair regard

Read the Quote

Bishop Of Canterbury
The King is full of grace and fair regard.
Bishop Of Ely
And a true lover of the holy Church.
Bishop of Canterbury
The courses of his youth promised it not.
The breath no sooner left his father’s body
But that his wildness, mortified in him,
Seemed to die too.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 24

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , ,

Angelo, There is a kind of character in thy life

Read the Quote

Angelo,
There is a kind of character in thy life,
That to th’ observer doth thy history
AlliterationFully unfoldHyperbaton
. Thyself and thy belongings
Are not thine own so properAnastrophe as to waste
Thyself upon thy virtues, they on thee.
Heaven doth with us as we with torches do,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 29

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , ,

Tush, tush, ’twill not appear

Read the Quote

Horatio 
Tush, tush, ’twill not appear.Alliteration & Epizeuxis
Barnardo
Sit down awhile,
And let us once again assail your ears,
That are so fortified against our story,Synecdoche & Assonance

What we have two nights seen.Anastrophe

Before my God,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 35

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, , ,

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , , , ,

Andronicus, stain not thy tomb with blood.

Read the Quote

Tamora
Andronicus, stain notHyperbaton thy tomb with blood.
Wilt thou draw near the nature of the gods?Rhetorical Question
Draw near them then in being merciful.
Sweet mercy is nobility’s true badge.Metaphor
Thrice-noble TitusAlliteration, spare my first-born son.
… continue reading this quote

This butcher’s cur is venomed-mouthed

Read the Quote

Buckingham
This butcher’s cur is venomed-mouthed, and I
Have not the power to muzzle him; therefore best
Not wake him in his slumber. A beggar’s book
Outworths a noble’s blood.Metaphors

Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot
That it do singe yourself.

Norfolk
What,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 143

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , , ,

Connected Notes:
Fire and Gold

It was about to speak when the cock crew

Read the Quote

Barnardo
It was about to speak when the cock crew.
Horatio
And then it started like a guilty thing
Upon a fearful summons.Simile
I have heard
The cock, that is the trumpet to the mornMetaphor,
Doth with his lofty and shrill-sounding throat
Awake the god of day,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 162

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

Themes:
, , ,

Figures of Speech:
, , ,

Connected Notes:
Seasons, Elements and Humors, Birds — Martial and Marital

Your office, Sergeant: execute it

Read the Quote

Brandon
Your office, Sergeant: execute it.Hyperbaton
Sergeant, to Buckingham
Sir,
My lord the Duke of Buckingham and Earl
Of Hertford, Stafford, and Northampton, I
Arrest thee of high treason, in the name
Of our most sovereign king.

I am the shadow of poor Buckingham,
… continue reading this quote