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Ambage

Ambage (am'-bij) is the excessive use of words in an ambiguous or indirect manner. “But be contented when that fell arrest / Without all bail shall carry me away, / My life hath in this line some interest, / Which for memorial still with thee shall stay.” Sonnet 74. Ambage is similar to circumlocution, in that both use excessive words and are indirect, but a circumlocution circles around the meaning and an ambage creates ambiguity.  Also see periphrasis.

Ambage is an example of:
Addition

But be contented when that fell arrest

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But be contented when that fell arrest
Without all bail shall carry me away,Ambage

My life hath in this line some interest,
Which for memorial still with thee shall stay.
When thou reviewest this, thou dost review
The very part was consecrate to thee.
The earth can have but earth, which is his due;
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