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Adynaton

Adynaton (a-dyn'-a-ton) is an extreme form of hyperbole in which the exaggeration could not possibly happen in reality. “Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood Clean from my hand?” Macbeth, 2.2.78

Adynaton is an example of:
Augmentation

Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing

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Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice.Adynaton His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff: you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search.Simile
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 121

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Figures of Speech:
,

Why, how now, Claudio? Whence comes this restraint?

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Lucio
Why, how now, Claudio? Whence comes this restraint?
Claudio
From too much liberty, my Lucio, liberty.Diacope
As surfeit is the father of much fast,Simile & Alliteration
So every scope by the immoderate use
Turns to restraint.Irony
Our natures do pursue,
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Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world

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Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Like a Colossus, and we petty men
Walk under his huge legs, and peep about
To find ourselves dishonorable graves.Adynaton & Simile

The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves, that we are underlings.

Men at some time are masters of their fates;
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Thrift, thrift, Horatio

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Hamlet 
Thrift, thrift, Horatio.Epizeuxis The funeral baked meats
Did coldly furnish forth the marriage tables.Alliteration
Would I had met my dearest foe in heaven
Or ever I had seen that day, Horatio!
My father—methinks I see my father.

He was a man. Take him for all in all,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 187

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Spoken by:
,

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Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , ,

We have strict statutes and most biting laws

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Duke
We have strict statutes and most biting lawsMetaphor
The needful bits and curbs to headstrong weeds,Metaphor
Which for this fourteen years we have let slip,
Even like an o’ergrown lion in a cave,
That goes not out to prey. Now, as fond fathers,
Having bound up the threat’ning twigs of birch,

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Not for that neither. Here’s the pang that pinches

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Anne
Not for that neither.Anapodoton Here’s the pang that pinches:
His Highness having lived so long with herAlliteration
, and she
So good a lady that no tongue could ever
Pronounce dishonor of her—Parenthesesby my life,
She never knew harm-doing!—O, now,

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Admit no other way to save his life

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Angelo
Admit no other way to save his life—
As I subscribe not that, nor any other—
But, in the loss of question, that you, his sister,
Finding yourself desired of such a person
Whose credit with the judge, or own great place,
Could fetch your brother from Metonymythe manacles
Of the binding law,

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Now, Ursula, when Beatrice doth come

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Hero
Now, Ursula, when Beatrice doth come,
As we do trace this alley up and down,
Our talk must only be of Benedick.
When I do name him, let it be thy part
To praise him more than ever man did merit.

What fire is in mine ears?

My talk to thee must be how Benedick
Is sick in love with Beatrice.
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What news, friar, of the Duke?

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Lucio
What news, friar, of the Duke?
Duke, as Friar
I know none. Can you tell me of any?
Lucio
Some say he is with the Emperor of Russia; other
some, he is in Rome.Ellipis
But where is he, think you?
Duke,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 86

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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Themes:

Figures of Speech:
, , , , ,

Sir, I was an inward of his

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Lucio
Sir, I was an inward of his. A shy fellow was the
Duke, and I believe I know the cause of his
withdrawing.
Duke, as Friar
What, I prithee, might be the cause?
Lucio
No, pardon. ’Tis a secret must be locked within
the teeth and the lips.

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