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What, my young master? O my gentle master

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What, my young master? O my gentle master,
O my sweet master, O you memory
Of old Sir Rowland! Why, what make you here?
Why are you virtuous? Why do people love you?
And wherefore are you gentle, strong, and valiant?
Why would you be so fond to overcome
The bonny priser of the humorous Duke?
Your praise is come too swiftly home before you.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 3
Line 2

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:

What, old acquaintance, could not all this flesh

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Prince Hal, to Falstaff's apparent corpse
What, old acquaintance, could not all this flesh
Keep in a little life? Poor Jack, farewell.
I could have better spared a better man.
O, I should have a heavy miss of thee
If I were much in love with vanity.
Death hath not struck so fat a deer today,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 4
Line 104

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

What, shall I come? The hour?

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Diomedes
What, shall I come? The hour?
Cressida
Ay, come.—O Jove!—Do, come.—I shall be plagued.
Diomedes
Farewell, till then.
Cressida
Good night. I prithee, come.—
He exits.
Troilus, farewell. One eye yet looks on thee,
But with my heart the other eye doth see.
Ah,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 2
Line 126

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

What, would you make me mad?

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Sly
What, would you make me mad? Am not I Christopher
Sly, old Sly’s son of Burton Heath, by birth a
peddler, by education a cardmaker, by transmutation
a bearherd, and now by present profession a
tinker? Ask Marian Hacket, the fat alewife of Wincot,
if she know me not! If she say I am not fourteen
pence on the score for sheer ale,
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Source:
Act Induction
Scene 2
Line 26

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Spoken by:
, , , ,

What's gone and what's past help

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What's gone and what's past help
Should be past grief.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2

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What's the matter, you dissentious rogues

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What's the matter, you dissentious rogues,
That rubbing the poor itch of your opinion
Make yourselves scabsMetaphor
?…
He that will give good words to thee will flatter
Beneath abhorring. What would you have, you curs,
That like nor peace nor war? The one affrights you,
The other makes you proud. He that trusts to you,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 174

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Figures of Speech:
, ,

Connected Notes:
Pandering, Contempt and the Masses

What's your pleasure, sir?

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Enobarbus
What's your pleasure, sir?
Antony
I must with haste from hence.
Enobarbus
Why then we kill all our women. We see
how mortal an unkindness is to them. If they suffer
our departure, death's the word.
Antony
I must be gone.
Enobarbus
Under a compelling occasion,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 146

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

What’s your name, sir?

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Falstaff
What’s your name, sir? Of what condition are
you, and of what place, I pray?
Colevile
I am a knight, sir, and my name is Colevile of
the Dale.
Falstaff
Well then, Colevile is your name, a knight is
your degree, and your place the Dale. Colevile shall
be still your name,
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 2
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:

When beggars die there are no comets seen

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Calphurnia
When beggars die there are no comets seen;
The heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes.
Julius Caesar
Cowards die many times before their deaths,
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 31

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Spoken by:
,

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:

When clouds are seen, wise men put on their cloaks

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When clouds are seen, wise men put on their cloaks;
When great leaves fall, then winter is at hand;
When the sun sets, who doth not look for night?
Untimely storms makes men expect a dearth.
All may be well; but if God sort it so,
‘Tis more than we deserve or I expect.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 3

Source Type:

Spoken by:

When daffodils begin to peer

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When daffodils begin to peer,
With heigh, the doxy over the dale,
Why, then comes in the sweet o' the year,
For the red blood reigns in the winter's pale.

The white sheet bleaching on the hedge,
With heigh, the sweet birds, O how they sing!
Doth set my pugging tooth an edge,
For a quart of ale is a dish for a king.

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Source:
Act 4
Scene 3
Line 1

Source Type:
,

Spoken by:

When I would pray and think, I think and pray

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When I would pray and think, I think and pray
To several subjects. Heaven hath my empty words,
Whilst my invention, hearing not my tongue,
Anchors on Isabel.

Blood, thou art blood.
Let’s write “good angel” on the devil’s horn

God in my mouth,
As if I did but only chew His name,
And in my heart the strong and swelling evil
Of my conception.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 4
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

When in disgrace with Fortune and men's eyes

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When in disgrace with Fortune and men's eyes
I all alone beweep my outcast state,
And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries,
And look upon myself and curse my fate,
Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,
Featur'd like him, like him with friends possess'd,
Desiring this man's art, and that man's scope,
With what I most enjoy contented least;
Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising,
Haply I think on thee, and then my state
(Like to the lark at break of day arising
From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven's gate,
For thy sweet love rememb'red such wealth brings,
That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

Source:

Source Type:

Themes:

When in that moment (so it came to pass)

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When in that moment (so it came to pass)
Titania wak'd, and straightway lov'd an ass.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:

When shall we three meet again?

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First Witch
When shall we three meet again?
In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
Second Witch
When the hurly-burly’s done,
When the battle’s lost and won.

Fair is foul, and foul is fair

Third Witch
That will be ere the set of sun.
First Witch
Where the place?
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

Figures of Speech:

When she first met Mark Antony

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Enobarbus
When she first met Mark Antony, she
pursed up his heart upon the river of Cydnus.
Agrippa
There she appeared indeed, or my reporter
devised well for her.
Enobarbus
I will tell you.
The barge she sat in like a burnished throne
Burned on the water. The poop was beaten gold,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 222

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

When to the sessions of sweet silent thought

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When to the sessions of sweet silent thought
I summon up remembrance of things past,Alliteration

I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought,
And with old woes new wail my dear time's waste:Alliteration
Then can I drown an eye, unused to flow,
For precious friends hid in death's dateless night,
And weep afresh love's long since cancelled woe,
And moan the expense of many a vanished sight:
Then can I grieve at grievances foregone,Alliteration
And heavily from woe to woe tell o'er
The sad account of fore-bemoanèd moan,
Which I new pay as if not paid before.
But if the while I think on thee, dear friend,
All losses are restored and sorrows end.


Source Type:

Figures of Speech:

When we our betters see bearing our woes

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When we our betters see bearing our woes,
We scarcely think our miseries our foes.
Who alone suffers suffers most i' th' mind,
Leaving free things and happy shows behind.
But then the mind much sufferance doth o'erskip
When grief hath mates and bearing fellowship.
How light and portable my pain seems now
When that which makes me bend makes the King bow!
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 6
Line 111

Source Type:

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Themes:

When will this fearful slumber have an end?

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Titus Andronicus 
When will this fearful slumber have an end?
Marcus Andronicus
Now farewell, flatt'ry; die, Andronicus.
Thou dost not slumber. See thy two sons' heads,
Thy warlike hand, thy mangled daughter here,
Thy other banished son with this dear sight
Struck pale and bloodless; and thy brother, I,
Even like a stony image cold and numb.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 257

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Where be these enemies? Capulet! Montague!

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Where be these enemies? Capulet! Montague!
See what a scourge is laid upon your hate,
That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love.Paradox
And I for winking at your discords too
Have lost a brace of kinsmen. All are punish'd.
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 3
Line 301

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:

Connected Notes:
A Plague and a Scourge