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Polysyndeton

The repetition of conjunctions in a series of coordinate words, phrases, or clauses. “Nor stony tower, nor walls of beaten brass, / Nor airless dungeon, nor strong links of iron, / Can be retentive to the strength of spirit.” Julius Caesar, 1.3.92.  See Asyndeton, which omits all conjunctions between words or phrases in a series.

Polysyndeton is an example of:
Repetition

Then weigh what loss your honor may sustain

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Laertes
Then weigh what loss your honor may sustain
If with too credent ear you list his songs
PolysyndetonOr lose your heart or your chaste treasure open
To his unmastered importunity.Circumlocution

Fear it, Ophelia; fear it, my dear sister,Diacope
And keep you in the rear of your affection,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 33

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , , , ,

You are dull, Casca

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You are dull, Casca; and those sparks of life
That should be in a Roman you do want,
Or else you use not. You look pale, and gaze,
And put on fear, and cast yourself in wonder,Polysyndeton

To see the strange impatience of the heavens;
But if you would consider the true cause
Why all these fires,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 60

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
,

I know where I will wear this dagger then

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I know where I will wear this dagger then;
Cassius from bondage will deliver Cassius.
Therein, ye gods, you make the weak most strong;
Therein, ye gods, you tyrants do defeat;Anaphora

Nor stony tower, nor walls of beaten brass,
Nor airless dungeon, nor strong links of iron,Polysyndeton

Can be retentive to the strength of spirit;
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 92

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
,

And let us swear our resolution

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Cassius
And let us swear our resolution.
Marcus Brutus
No, not an oath!Anapodoton If not the face of men,
The sufferance of our souls, the time’s abuseIsocolon

If these be motives weakAnastrophe, break off betimes,
And every man hence to his idle bed;
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 124

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , , ,

Portia! What mean you? Wherefore rise you now?

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Brutus
Portia! What mean you? Wherefore rise you now?Hyperbaton & Quaesitio
It is not for your health thus to commit
Your weak condition to the raw cold morning.
Portia
Nor for yours neither.Anapodoton You’ve ungently, Brutus,
Stole from my bed. And yesternight at supper
You suddenly arose and walked about,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 254

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , ,

Connected Notes:
Wives and Troubled Husbands

The time was once, when thou unurg’d wouldst vow

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The time was onceHyperbaton when thou unurged wouldst vowAnastrophe
That never words were music to thine ear,
That never object pleasing in thine eye,
That never touch well welcome to thy hand,
That never meat sweet-savored in thy taste,Anaphora

Unless I spake, or looked,
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Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears!

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Antony
Friends, Romans, countrymenExordium, lend me your earsSynecdoche!
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.Antithesis
The evil that men do lives after them,
The good is oft interred with their bonesAntithesis
;
So let it be with Caesar.
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