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Polyptoton

Word play for words derived from the same root or cognate. Repeating words in different case forms. “Love is not love / Which alters when it alteration finds, / Or bends with the remover to remove.” Sonnet 116Related to Adnominatio and Paronomasia.

Polyptoton is an example of:
Repetition, Word Play

Let me not to the marriage of true minds

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Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments.Synecdoche
Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds
Or bends with the remover to remove.Polyptoton

O, no, it is an ever-fixèd mark
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wand’ring bark,Metaphor

Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.
Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle’s compass come;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error, and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.Litotes

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I find here that Don Pedro hath bestowed much honor

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Leonato
I find here that Don
Pedro hath bestowed much honor on a young
Florentine called Claudio.
Messenger
Much deserved on his part, and equally
remembered by Don Pedro.Anapodoton
He hath borne himself
beyond the promise of his age, doing in the figure
of a lamb the feats of a lion.

… continue reading this quote

Set down, set down your honorable load

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Set down, set down your honorable load,Epimone
If honor may be shrouded in a hearse,Personification
Whilst I awhile obsequiously lament
Th’ untimely fall of virtuous Lancaster.
   They set down the bier.
Poor key-cold figure of a holy king,Alliteration
Pale ashes of the house of Lancaster,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 1

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Speak you so gently? Pardon me, I pray you

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Orlando
Speak you so gently?Rhetorical Questions Pardon me, I pray you.
I thought that all things had been savage here,
And therefore put I on the countenanceAnastrophe
Of stern command’ment. But what e’er you are
That in this desert inaccessibleAnastrophe,
Under the shade of melancholy boughs,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 7
Line 106

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