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Paronomasia

Word play, especially involving words with similar sounds but more than one meaning. “Now is the winter or our discontent / Made glorious summer by this sun of York…” Richard III, 1.1.1. Related to Adnominatio and Polyptoton.

Paronomasia is an example of:
Substitution, Word Play

Hamlet’s First Words

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Hamlet’s first words in the play, about being more kin than kind, are an aside, not to another character but to himself. This Hamlet’s first and shortest soliloquy. Fittingly, they introduce Hamlet’s propensity for seeing a situation in two different and opposing lights, and his inclination to muse on his condition to himself rather than to discourse with another character.
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Now is the winter of our discontent

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NowHyperbaton is the winter of our discontentMetaphor
Made glorious summerMetaphor by this son of York,Paronomasia
And all the clouds that louredMetaphor upon our houseMetonymy
In the deep bosom of the ocean MetaphorburiedHyperbaton &
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Let us sit and mock the good huswife Fortune

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Celia
Let us sit and mock the good housewife Fortune
from her wheel, that her gifts may henceforth be
bestowed equally.Personification

Rosalind
I would we could do so, for her benefits are
mightily misplaced, and the bountiful blind woman
doth most mistake in her gifts to women.
Celia
‘Tis true,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 31

Source Type:

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Themes:
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Figures of Speech:
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Connected Notes:
Status of Women, Blind Fortune

And now, Laertes, what’s the news with you?

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King Claudius
And now, Laertes, what’s the news with you?
You told us of some suit. What is ’t, Laertes?
You cannot speak of reason to the Dane
And lose your voice. What wouldst thou beg, Laertes,
That shall not be my offer, not thy asking?
The head is not more native to the heart,
The hand more instrumental to the mouth,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 42

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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Themes:

Figures of Speech:

Connected Notes:
Hamlet’s First Words

Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world

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Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Like a ColossusSimile
, and we petty men
Walk under his huge legs, and peep about
To find ourselves dishonorable graves.Adynaton

Men at some time are masters of their fates;
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves,
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If I profane with my unworthiest hand

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Romeo
If I profane with my unworthiest hand
This holy shrineMetaphor, the gentle sinOxymoron is this,
My lips, two blushing pilgrimsMetaphor, ready stand
To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.
Juliet
Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
Which mannerly devotion shows in this:
For saints have hands that pilgrims’ hands do touch,
And palm to palm is holy palmers’ kissAntanaclesis or Paronomasia.
Romeo
Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?
Juliet
Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in pray’r.
Romeo
O then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do,
They pray—grant thou, lest faith turn to despair.
Juliet
Saints do not move, though grant for prayers’ sake.
Romeo
Then move not while my prayer’s effect I take.
(Kisses her)
Thus from my lips, by thine, my sin is purg’d.
Juliet
Then have my lips the sin that they have took.
Romeo
Sin from my lips? O trespass sweetly urg’d!

Source:
Act 1
Scene 5
Line 104

Source Type:
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Spoken by:
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Themes:
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Figures of Speech:
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Connected Notes:
Sonnets in Romeo and Juliet, Caves, Temples & Palaces

I doubt not of your wisdom

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I doubt not of your wisdom.
Let each man render me his bloody hand.
First, Marcus Brutus, will I shake with you;
Next, Caius Cassius, do I take your hand;
Now, Decius Brutus, yours; now yours, Metellus;
Yours, Cinna; and, my valiant Casca, yours;
Though last, not least in love, yours, good Trebonius.
Gentlemen all—alas, what shall I say?
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 200

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Figures of Speech:
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