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Metaphor

Most high, most mighty, and most puissant Caesar

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Metellus, kneeling
Most high, most mighty, and most puissant Caesar,Anaphora
Metellus Cimber throws before thy seat
An humble heart.Synecdoche
Caesar
I must prevent thee, Cimber.
These couchings and these lowly courtesies
Might fire the blood of ordinary menSynecdoche
And turn preordinance and first decree
Into the law of children.
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I doubt not of your wisdom

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I doubt not of your wisdom.
Let each man render me his bloody hand.
First, Marcus Brutus, will I shake with you;
Next, Caius Cassius, do I take your hand;
Now, Decius Brutus, yours; now yours, Metellus;
Yours, Cinna; and, my valiant Casca, yours;
Though last, not least in love, yours, good Trebonius.
Gentlemen all—alas, what shall I say?
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 200

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Figures of Speech:
, ,

Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds

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Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds,
Towards Phoebus’ lodging. Such a wagoner
As Phaëton would whip you to the west
And bring in cloudy night immediately.
Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night,
That runaways’ eyes may wink, and Romeo
Leap to these arms, untalked of and unseen.
Lovers can see to do their amorous rites
By their own beauties,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 1

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Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , ,

Now tell me, madam, do you love your children?

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King Edward
Now tell me, madam, do you love your children?
Lady Grey
Ay, full as dearly as I love myself.
King Edward
And would you not do much to do them good?
Lady Grey
To do them good I would sustain some harm.
King Edward
Then get your husband’s lands to do them good.

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O serpent heart, hid with a flow’ring face!

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O serpent heart, hid with a flow’ring face!Paradox
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?Metaphor
Beautiful tyrant!Oxymoron Fiend angelical!Oxymoron
Dove-feather’d raven!Oxymoron Wolvish ravening lamb!Oxymoron

Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound?
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 79

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Figures of Speech:
, ,

Connected Notes:
Caves, Temples & Palaces

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears!

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Antony
Friends, Romans, countrymenExordium, lend me your earsSynecdoche!
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.Antithesis
The evil that men do lives after them,
The good is oft interred with their bonesAntithesis
;
So let it be with Caesar.
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Search out thy wit for secret policies

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Bastard
Search out thy wit for secret policies,
And we will make thee famous through the world.
Alanson, to Pucelle
We’ll set thy statue in some holy place
And have thee reverenced like a blessèd saint.Simile
Employ thee then, sweet virgin, for our good.

O,
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You common cry of curs, whose breath I hate

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You common cry of curs, Anaphorawhose breath I hate
SimileAs reek a’ th’ rotten fens, whose loves I prize
SimileAs the dead carcasses of unburied men
That do corrupt my airAlliteration & Metaphor
—I banish you!
And here remainHyperbaton with your uncertainty!
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O Hamlet, thou hast cleft my heart in twain

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Queen Gertrude
O Hamlet, thou hast cleft my heart in twain!
Hamlet
O, throw away the worser part of it,
And live the purer with the other half!
Good night. But go not to my uncle’s bed.

Assume a virtue if you have it not.

Assume a virtue if you have it not.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 4
Line 177

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , ,

It was the lark, the herald of the morn

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It was the lark, the herald of the morn,
No nightingale. Look, love, what envious streaks
Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east.
Night’s candles are burnt outMetaphor, and jocund day
Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain topsPersonification
.
I must be gone and live, or stay and dieAlliosis.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 5
Line 6

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Figures of Speech:
, ,

Connected Notes:
Birds — Martial and Marital