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Litotes

An understatement in which an affirmative is expressed by negating its opposite. “He hath not failed to pester us with message.” Hamlet, 1.2.1

Litotes is an example of:
Comparison, Substitution

Let me not to the marriage of true minds

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Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments.Synecdoche
Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds
Or bends with the remover to remove.Polyptoton

O, no, it is an ever-fixèd mark
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wand’ring bark,Metaphor

Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.
Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle’s compass come;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error, and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.Litotes

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Though yet of Hamlet our dear brother’s death

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Though yet of Hamlet our dear brother’s death
The memory be green, and that it us befitted
To bear our hearts in grief, and our whole kingdom
To be contracted in one brow of woe,
Yet so far hath discretion fought with nature
That we with wisest sorrow think on him
Together with remembrance of ourselves.

With mirth in funeral and with dirge in marriage,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 1

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Speak you so gently? Pardon me, I pray you

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Orlando
Speak you so gently?Rhetorical Questions Pardon me, I pray you.
I thought that all things had been savage here,
And therefore put I on the countenanceAnastrophe
Of stern command’ment. But what e’er you are
That in this desert inaccessibleAnastrophe,
Under the shade of melancholy boughs,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 7
Line 106

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Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears!

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Antony
Friends, Romans, countrymenExordium, lend me your earsSynecdoche!
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.Antithesis
The evil that men do lives after them,
The good is oft interred with their bonesAntithesis
;
So let it be with Caesar.
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