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Isocolon

Isocolon is a generic term for two or more clauses of equal length and parallel syntax and rhythm. When there are more than two, the figure can be more specifically named (though they are not in the quotes on this website) tricolons, tetracolons, etc. “My gorgeous palace for a hermitage, / My gay apparel for an almsman’s gown, / My figured goblets for a dish of wood, / My scepter for a palmer’s walking-staff, / My subjects for a pair of carvèd saints.” Richard II, 3.3.148. This quote from Richard II strings five clauses of parallel syntax in sequence and, because the clauses all begin with he same word, this is also an example of Anaphora.

Isocolon is an example of:
Arrangement, Parallelism, Repetition

Hear him but reason in divinity

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Hear him but reason in divinity,
And all-admiring, with an inward wish
You would desire the King were made a prelate;
Hear him debate of commonwealth affairs,
You would say it hath been all in all his studyAnaphora & Isocolon
;
List his discourse of war, and you shall hear
A fearful battle rend’red you in music;
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Wherefore rejoice? What conquest brings he home?

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Wherefore rejoice? What conquest brings he home?
What tributaries follow him to Rome,
To grace in captive bonds his chariot-wheels?Quaesitio

You blocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things!
O you hard hearts, you cruel men of Rome,
Knew you not Pompey?Anaphora
Many a time and oftHendiadys
Have you climb’d up to walls and battlements,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 36

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Figures of Speech:
, , , ,

Connected Notes:
Pandering, Contempt and the Masses

Moderate lamentation is the right of the dead

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Moderate lamentation is the right of the dead, excessive grief the enemy to the livingAlliosis, Ellipsis & Isocolon.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 57

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:
, ,

Love all, trust a few

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Love all, trust a few,
Do wrong to noneIsocolon
. Be able for thine enemy
Rather in power than use, and keep thy friend
Under thy own life’s key. Be check’d for silence,
But never tax’d for speechAlliosis
.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 66

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:
,

Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world

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Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Like a ColossusSimile
, and we petty men
Walk under his huge legs, and peep about
To find ourselves dishonorable graves.Adynaton

Men at some time are masters of their fates;
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves,
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That you do love me, I am nothing jealous

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Brutus
That you do love me, I am nothing jealous;
What you would work me to, I have some aim.
How I have thought of this, and of these times,
I shall recount hereafter.Isocolon
For this present,
I would not (so with love I might entreat you)
Be any further mov’d. What you have said
I will consider;

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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 171

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Figures of Speech:
, ,

Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile

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Duke Senior
Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile,
Hath not old custom made this life more sweet
Than that of Alliterationpainted pomp? Are not these woods
More free from peril than the envious court?Quaesitio

Here feel we not the penalty of Adam,
The seasons’ difference,

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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , ,

Connected Notes:
Town and Country

Therefore I pray you lead me to the caskets

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Therefore I pray you lead me to the caskets
To try my fortune. By this scimitar
That slew the Sophy and a Persian prince,
That won three fields of Sultan Solyman,Anaphora

I would Alliterationo’erstare the sternest eyes that look,
Outbrave the heart most daring on the Earth,
Pluck the young sucking cubs from the she-bear,

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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 23

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Spoken by:

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , ,

Connected Notes:
Blind Fortune

And let us swear our resolution

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Cassius
And let us swear our resolution.
Marcus Brutus
No, not an oath!Anapodoton If not the face of men,
The sufferance of our souls, the time’s abuseIsocolon

If these be motives weakAnastrophe, break off betimes,
And every man hence to his idle bed;
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 124

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , , ,

This battle fares like to the morning’s war

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This battle fares like to the morning’s war,
When dying clouds contend with growing light,
What time the shepherd, blowing of his nails,
Can neither call it perfect day nor night.

Would I were dead, if God’s good will were so,
For what is in this world but grief and woe?

Simile, Anaphora & IsocolonNow sways it this way,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 5
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
, , ,

Figures of Speech:
, , ,