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Irony

Use of words to convey the opposite of their literal meaning. “Prodigious birth of love it is to me / That I must love a loathèd enemy.” Romeo and Juliet, 1.5.152

Irony is an example of:
Comparison, Substitution

Sonnets in Romeo and Juliet

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Shakespeare, who had begun writing his sonnets sometime in the 1590’s, decided that the form would be useful in Romeo and Juliet. In fact, he wrote four sonnets in the play. The first, spoken by a chorus, opens Act 1. The second appears in Act 1, Scene 5, and it is dialogue spoken by Romeo and Juliet.
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Tempter or Tempted?

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In Measure for Measure (2.2.197), Angelo confronts, possibly for the first time in his life, the temptation of lust. And since this is new to him and because he is highly moralistic, he is troubled and confused. He reacts by asking himself a series of questions for which he has no answers.

What’s this? What’s this? Is this her fault,
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If I profane with my unworthiest hand

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Romeo
If I profane with my unworthiest hand
This holy shrineMetaphor, the gentle sinOxymoron is this,
My lips, two blushing pilgrimsMetaphor, ready stand
To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.
Juliet
Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
Which mannerly devotion shows in this:
For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do touch,
And palm to palm is holy palmers' kissAntanaclesis or Paronomasia.
Romeo
Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?
Juliet
Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in pray'r.
Romeo
O then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do,
They pray—grant thou, lest faith turn to despair.
Juliet
Saints do not move, though grant for prayers' sake.
Romeo
Then move not while my prayer's effect I take.
(Kisses her)
Thus from my lips, by thine, my sin is purg'd.
Juliet
Then have my lips the sin that they have took.
Romeo
Sin from my lips? O trespass sweetly urg'd!

Source:
Act 1
Scene 5
Line 104

Source Type:
,

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , ,

Connected Notes:
Sonnets in Romeo and Juliet, Caves, Temples & Palaces

My only love sprung from my only hate!

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My only love sprung from my only hate!Paradox
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!Epanalepsis
Prodigious birth of love it is to me
That I must love a loathèd enemy.Irony

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Source:
Act 1
Scene 5
Line 152

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
, ,

Never fear that

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Never fear that. If he be so resolv’d,
I can o’ersway him; for he loves to hear
That unicorns may be betray’d with trees,
And bears with glasses, elephants with holes,
Lions with toils, and men with flatterers;Ellipses

But when I tell him he hates flatterers
He says he does, being then most flattered.

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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 219

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
,

Connected Notes:
The Snare of Vanity

At what hour tomorrow Shall I attend your Lordship?

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Isabella
At what hour tomorrow
Shall I attend your Lordship?
Angelo
At any time ‘fore noon.
Isabella

‘Save your honor!

Exeunt Isabella, Lucio, and Provost.

Angelo
From thee: even from thy virtue.Irony
What’s this? What’s this? Is this her fault,
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How mightily sometimes we make us comforts of our losses

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First Lord
How mightily sometimes we make us comforts of our losses!Irony
Second Lord
And how mightily some other times we drown our gain in tears!Irony The great dignity that his valor hath here acquir’d for him shall at home be encount’red with a shame as ample.
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 3
Line 68

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Figures of Speech:

I have deceived even your very eyes

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I have deceived even your very eyes. What your wisdoms could not discover, these shallow fools have brought to light.Irony
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line 242

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
, , ,

Figures of Speech:

Connected Notes:
Appearance and Deception