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Epistrophe

Repetition of a word or phrase at the end of successive clauses, lines, or sentences. “Is it possible he should know what he is, and be that he is?” All's Well That Ends Well, 4.1.45

Epistrophe is an example of:
Repetition

Sexual Extortion

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In Measure for Measure (2.4.95), Angelo, the classic sexual harasser, adopts a method of sexual extortion similar to King Edward’s in Henry VI Part 3 (3.2.36).  Both men begin with oblique insinuations about their desires, which can be innocently misread. When the women, Isabella in Measure for Measure and Lady Grey in Henry VI,
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In sooth I know not why I am so sad

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Antonio
In sooth I know not why I am so sad.
It wearies me, you say it wearies you.
But how I caught it, found it, or came by it,Epistrophe
What stuff ’tis made of, whereof it is born,
I am to learn.
And such a want-wit sadness makes of meHyperbaton
That I have much ado to know myself.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , ,

Connected Notes:
The Sadness of the Merchant

Now is the winter of our discontent

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NowHyperbaton is the winter of our discontentMetaphor
Made glorious summerMetaphor by this son of York,Paronomasia
And all the clouds that louredMetaphor upon our houseMetonymy
In the deep bosom of the ocean MetaphorburiedHyperbaton & Ellipsis.
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But soft, behold! Lo where it comes again!

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But soft, behold! Lo, where it comes again!
I’ll cross it though it blast me. Stay, illusion!
It spreads his arms.
If thou hast any sound or use of voice,
Speak to me.
If there be any good thing to be done
That may to thee do ease, and grace to me,
Speak to me.

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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 138

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
,

Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world

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Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Like a ColossusSimile
, and we petty men
Walk under his huge legs, and peep about
To find ourselves dishonorable graves.Adynaton

Men at some time are masters of their fates;
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves,
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And let us swear our resolution

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Cassius
And let us swear our resolution.
Marcus Brutus
No, not an oath!Anapodoton If not the face of men,
The sufferance of our souls, the time’s abuseIsocolon

If these be motives weakAnastrophe, break off betimes,
And every man hence to his idle bed;
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 124

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , , ,

The time was once, when thou unurg’d wouldst vow

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The time was onceHyperbaton when thou unurged wouldst vowAnastrophe
That never words were music to thine ear,
That never object pleasing in thine eye,
That never touch well welcome to thy hand,
That never meat sweet-savored in thy taste,Anaphora

Unless I spake, or looked,
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Romans, countrymen, and lovers, hear me for my cause

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Marcus Brutus
Romans, countrymen, and lovers,Exordium hear me for my cause, and be silent, that you may hear. Believe me for mine honor, and have respect to mine honor, that you may believe. Censure me in your wisdom, and awake your senses, that you may the better judge.Epanalepses & Isocolon If there be any in this assembly,
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Now tell me, madam, do you love your children?

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King Edward
Now tell me, madam, do you love your children?
Lady Grey
Ay, full as dearly as I love myself.
King Edward
And would you not do much to do them good?
Lady Grey
To do them good I would sustain some harm.
King Edward
Then get your husband’s lands to do them good.

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Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears!

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Antony
Friends, Romans, countrymenExordium, lend me your earsSynecdoche!
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.Antithesis
The evil that men do lives after them,
The good is oft interred with their bonesAntithesis
;
So let it be with Caesar.
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Search out thy wit for secret policies

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Bastard
Search out thy wit for secret policies,
And we will make thee famous through the world.
Alanson, to Pucelle
We’ll set thy statue in some holy place
And have thee reverenced like a blessèd saint.Simile
Employ thee then, sweet virgin, for our good.

O,
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