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Ellipsis

Omission of one or more words, which are assumed by the listener or reader. Omitting a word implied by the previous clause. “If to do were as easy as to know what were good to do, chapels had been churches, and poor men’s cottages princes’ palaces.” Merchant of Venice, 1.2.1

Ellipsis is an example of:
Omission

Richard III and the Sonnet

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“Now is the winter of our discontent” is nearly as familiar as Hamlet’s, “To be, or not to be” and Mark Antony’s, “Friends, Romans, countrymen”. Not one of these three passages is a dramatic dialogue. Mark Antony addresses a large Roman crowd in an extended speech. Hamlet muses to himself in a soliloquy while we the audience listen in. Richard, however,
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Now is the winter of our discontent

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NowHyperbaton is the winter of our discontentMetaphor
Made glorious summerMetaphor by this son of York,Paronomasia
And all the clouds that louredMetaphor upon our houseMetonymy
In the deep bosom of the ocean MetaphorburiedHyperbaton &
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We are accounted poor citizens, the patricians good

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We are accounted poor citizens, the patricians goodEllipsis. What authority surfeits on would relieve us. If they would yield us but the superfluity while it were wholesome, we might guess they reliev’d us humanely; but they think we are too dear. The leanness that afflicts us, the object of our misery, is as an inventory to particularize their abundance;
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 14

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Figures of Speech:
,

Connected Notes:
Income Inequality

Moderate lamentation is the right of the dead

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Moderate lamentation is the right of the dead, excessive grief the enemy to the livingAlliosis, Ellipsis & Isocolon.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 57

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:
, ,

Andronicus, stain not thy tomb with blood.

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Tamora
Andronicus, stain notHyperbaton thy tomb with blood.
Wilt thou draw near the nature of the gods?Rhetorical Question
Draw near them then in being merciful.
Sweet mercy is nobility’s true badge.Metaphor
Thrice-noble TitusAlliteration, spare my first-born son.
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What’s the matter, you dissentious rogues

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What’s the matter, you dissentious rogues,
That rubbing the poor itch of your opinion
Make yourselves scabsMetaphor
?…
He that will give good words to thee will flatter
Beneath abhorring. What would you have, you curs,
That like nor peace nor war? The one affrights you,
The other makes you proud. He that trusts to you,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 174

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Figures of Speech:
, ,

Connected Notes:
Pandering, Contempt and the Masses

Monsieur Parolles, my lord calls for you

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Page
Monsieur Parolles, my lord calls for you.
Parolles
Little Helen, farewell. If I can remember
thee, I will think of thee at court.
Helen
Monsieur Parolles, you were born under a
charitable star.
Parolles
Under Mars, I.Hyperbaton & Ellipsis
Helen
I especially think under Mars.
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By my troth, Nerissa, my little body is aweary of this great world

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Portia
By my troth, Nerissa, my little body is aweary
of this great world.
Nerissa
You would be, sweet madam, if your miseries
were in the same abundance as your good fortunes
are. And yet, for aught I see, they are as sick that
surfeit with too much as they that starve with
nothing.

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Well, Brutus, thou art noble

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Well, Brutus, thou art noble; yet I see
Thy honorable mettle may be wrought
From that it is dispos’d; therefore it is meet
That noble minds keep ever with their likes;
For who so firm that cannot be seduc’d?Rhetorical Question and Ellipsis
Caesar doth bear me hard, but he loves Brutus.
If I were Brutus now and he were Cassius,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 320

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
,

Signior Antonio, many a time and oft

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Shylock
Signior Antonio, many a time and oftHendiadys
In the Rialto you have rated me
About my moneys and my usances.
Still have I borne it with a patient shrug
(For suff’rance is the badge of all our tribe).
You call me misbeliever, cutthroat dog,
And spet upon my Jewish gaberdine,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 116

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , ,

Connected Notes:
Christians and Jews

O worthiest cousin, The sin of my ingratitude

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Duncan
O worthiest cousin,
The sin of my ingratitude even now
Was heavy on me. Thou art so far before
That swiftest wing of recompense is slow
To overtake thee. Would thou hadst less deserved,Metaphor

That the proportion both of thanks and payment
Might have been mine! Only I have left to say,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 4
Line 17

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , ,