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Circumlocution

Using more words than necessary, or evasive words, in order to circle around a meaning and to avoid being direct. “Then weigh what loss your honor may sustain / If with too credent ear you list his songs / Or lose your heart or your chaste treasure open / To his unmastered importunity. / Fear it, Ophelia; fear it, my dear sister.” Hamlet. 1.3.33. See also Ambage, Amplification, Euphemism, and Periphrasis.

Circumlocution is an example of:
Addition

Then weigh what loss your honor may sustain

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Laertes
Then weigh what loss your honor may sustain
If with too credent ear you list his songs
PolysyndetonOr lose your heart or your chaste treasure open
To his unmastered importunity.Circumlocution

Fear it, Ophelia; fear it, my dear sister,Diacope
And keep you in the rear of your affection,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 33

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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Themes:
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Figures of Speech:
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