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Aphaearesis

Deletion a syllable or letter from the beginning of a word to create a new word. “O thou dull god, why liest thou with the vile / In loathsome beds, and leav'st the kingly couch / A watch-case or a common ‘larum-bell?” Henry IV Pt2, 3.1.3. Also see Syncope, the removal of a syllable or letter from the middle of a word, and Apocope, the deletion of a syllable or letter from the end of a word.

Aphaearesis is an example of:
Omission

How many thousand of my poorest subjects

Read the Quote

How many thousand of my poorest subjects
Are at this hour asleep! O sleep, O gentle sleep,
Nature’s soft nurse, how have I frightened thee,
That thou no more will weigh my eyelids down,
And steep my senses in forgetfulness?Personification

Uneasy lies the head that wears the crown.

Why rather, sleep, liest thou in smoky cribs,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 4

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
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Figures of Speech:
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