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Anastrophe

Type of Hyperbaton in which usually only a single word is misplaced or reversed from it expected order. Most often the adjective appears after the noun when we expect to find it before the noun. “Plots have I laid, inductions dangerous, / By drunken prophecies, libels, and dreams, / To set my brother Clarence and the King / In deadly hate.” Richard III, 1.1.1.

Anastrophe is an example of:
Arrangement

Richard III and the Sonnet

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“Now is the winter of our discontent” is nearly as familiar as Hamlet’s, “To be, or not to be” and Mark Antony’s, “Friends, Romans, countrymen”. Not one of these three passages is a dramatic dialogue. Mark Antony addresses a large Roman crowd in an extended speech. Hamlet muses to himself in a soliloquy while we the audience listen in. Richard, however,
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In Troy there lies the scene

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Enter the Prologue in armor.

In Troy there lies the scene.Hyperbaton From isles of Greece
The princes orgulousAnastrophe, their high blood chafed,
Have to the port of Athens sent their shipsHyperbaton
Fraught with the ministers and instruments
Of cruel war. Sixty and nine,
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Source:
Act 1
Line Prologue

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
,

Hear him but reason in divinity

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Hear him but reason in divinity,
And all-admiring, with an inward wish
You would desire the King were made a prelate;
Hear him debate of commonwealth affairs,
You would say it hath been all in all his studyAnaphora & Isocolon
;
List his discourse of war, and you shall hear
A fearful battle rend’red you in music;
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Now is the winter of our discontent

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NowHyperbaton is the winter of our discontentMetaphor
Made glorious summerMetaphor by this son of York,Paronomasia
And all the clouds that louredMetaphor upon our houseMetonymy
In the deep bosom of the ocean MetaphorburiedHyperbaton &
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Angelo, There is a kind of character in thy life

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Angelo,
There is a kind of character in thy life,
That to th’ observer doth thy history
AlliterationFully unfoldHyperbaton
. Thyself and thy belongings
Are not thine own so properAnastrophe as to waste
Thyself upon thy virtues, they on thee.
Heaven doth with us as we with torches do,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 29

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , ,

Andronicus, stain not thy tomb with blood.

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Tamora
Andronicus, stain notHyperbaton thy tomb with blood.
Wilt thou draw near the nature of the gods?Rhetorical Question
Draw near them then in being merciful.
Sweet mercy is nobility’s true badge.Metaphor
Thrice-noble TitusAlliteration, spare my first-born son.
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It was about to speak when the cock crew

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Barnardo
It was about to speak when the cock crew.
Horatio
And then it started like a guilty thing
Upon a fearful summons.Simile
I have heard
The cock, that is the trumpet to the mornMetaphor,
Doth with his lofty and shrill-sounding throat
Awake the god of day,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 162

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Spoken by:
, ,

Themes:
, , ,

Figures of Speech:
, , ,

Connected Notes:
Seasons, Elements and Humors, Birds — Martial and Marital

Then weigh what loss your honor may sustain

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Laertes
Then weigh what loss your honor may sustain
If with too credent ear you list his songs
PolysyndetonOr lose your heart or your chaste treasure open
To his unmastered importunity.Circumlocution

Fear it, Ophelia; fear it, my dear sister,Diacope
And keep you in the rear of your affection,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 33

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , , , ,

Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile

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Duke Senior
Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile,
Hath not old custom made this life more sweet
Than that of Alliterationpainted pomp? Are not these woods
More free from peril than the envious court?Quaesitio

Here feel we not the penalty of Adam,
The seasons’ difference,

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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , ,

Connected Notes:
Town and Country

And let us swear our resolution

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Cassius
And let us swear our resolution.
Marcus Brutus
No, not an oath!Anapodoton If not the face of men,
The sufferance of our souls, the time’s abuseIsocolon

If these be motives weakAnastrophe, break off betimes,
And every man hence to his idle bed;
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 124

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , , ,

The time was once, when thou unurg’d wouldst vow

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The time was onceHyperbaton when thou unurged wouldst vowAnastrophe
That never words were music to thine ear,
That never object pleasing in thine eye,
That never touch well welcome to thy hand,
That never meat sweet-savored in thy taste,Anaphora

Unless I spake, or looked,
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