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Analogy

Comparison between two situations for the purpose of explanation or clarification. “What's in a name? That which we call a rose / By any other word would smell as sweet; / So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call'd.” Romeo and Juliet, 2.2.36.

Analogy is an example of:
Comparison

There was a time when all the body’s members

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Menenius Agrippa
There was a time when all the body’s members
Rebell’d against the belly; thus accus’d it:
That only like a gulf it did remain
I’ th’ midst a’ th’ body, idle and unactive,
Still cupboarding the viand, never bearing
Like labor with the rest, where th’ other instruments
Did see and hear, devise, instruct,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 98

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Figures of Speech:
, ,

Connected Notes:
Income Inequality

By my troth, Nerissa, my little body is aweary of this great world

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Portia
By my troth, Nerissa, my little body is aweary
of this great world.
Nerissa
You would be, sweet madam, if your miseries
were in the same abundance as your good fortunes
are. And yet, for aught I see, they are as sick that
surfeit with too much as they that starve with
nothing.

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Tut, man, one fire burns out another’s burning

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Tut, man, one fire burns out another’s burning,Analogy
One pain is less’ned by another’s anguish;Analogy
Turn giddy, and be holp by backward turning;Analogy
One desperate grief cures with another’s languish:Analogy
Take thou some new infection to thy eye,
And the rank poison of the old will die.

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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 47

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Figures of Speech:

O that this too too solid flesh would melt

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O, that this too too sullied flesh would melt,
Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew!
Or that the Everlasting had not fix’d
His canon ‘gainst self-slaughter! O God, God,
How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable
Seem to me all the uses of this world!

O God, God,
How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable
Seem to me all the uses of this world!
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 133

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , ,

Connected Notes:
Hamlet’s First Soliloguy

Then weigh what loss your honor may sustain

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Laertes
Then weigh what loss your honor may sustain
If with too credent ear you list his songs
PolysyndetonOr lose your heart or your chaste treasure open
To his unmastered importunity.Circumlocution

Fear it, Ophelia; fear it, my dear sister,Diacope
And keep you in the rear of your affection,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 33

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , , , , ,

Therefore I pray you lead me to the caskets

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Therefore I pray you lead me to the caskets
To try my fortune. By this scimitar
That slew the Sophy and a Persian prince,
That won three fields of Sultan Solyman,Anaphora

I would Alliterationo’erstare the sternest eyes that look,
Outbrave the heart most daring on the Earth,
Pluck the young sucking cubs from the she-bear,

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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 23

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
, , , , , ,

Connected Notes:
Blind Fortune

O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?

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Juliet
O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I’ll no longer be a Capulet.

That which we call a rose
By any other word would smell as sweet

Romeo, aside
Shall I hear more,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 36

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:

Connected Notes:
You and Thee

At what hour tomorrow Shall I attend your Lordship?

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Isabella
At what hour tomorrow
Shall I attend your Lordship?
Angelo
At any time ‘fore noon.
Isabella

‘Save your honor!

Exeunt Isabella, Lucio, and Provost.

Angelo
From thee: even from thy virtue.Irony
What’s this? What’s this? Is this her fault,
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Most high, most mighty, and most puissant Caesar

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Metellus, kneeling
Most high, most mighty, and most puissant Caesar,Anaphora
Metellus Cimber throws before thy seat
An humble heart.Synecdoche
Caesar
I must prevent thee, Cimber.
These couchings and these lowly courtesies
Might fire the blood of ordinary menSynecdoche
And turn preordinance and first decree
Into the law of children.
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This is a slight unmeritable man

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Mark Antony
This is a slight unmeritable man,
Meet to be sent on errandsAlliteration
; is it fit,
The threefold world divided, he should stand
One of the three to share it?
Octavius Caesar
So you thought him,
And took his voice who should be prick’d to die
In our black sentence and proscription.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 14

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Figures of Speech:
, ,