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You sad-faced men, people and sons of Rome

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You sad-faced men, people and sons of Rome,
By uproars severed as a flight of fowl
Scattered by winds and high tempestuous gusts,
O, let me teach you how to knit again
This scattered corn into one mutual sheaf,
These broken limbs again into one body,
Lest Rome herself be bane unto herself,
And she whom mighty kingdoms curtsy to,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 3
Line 68

Spoken by:

I would not be thy executioner

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I would not be thy executioner.
I fly thee, for I would not injure thee.
Thou tell'st me there is murder in mine eye.
‘Tis pretty, sure, and very probable
That eyes, that are the frail'st and softest things,
Who shut their coward gates on atomies,
Should be called tyrants, butchers, murderers.
Now I do frown on thee with all my heart,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 5
Line 9

Spoken by:

We have scorched the snake, not killed it

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Macbeth
We have scorched the snake, not killed it.
She'll close and be herself whilst our poor malice
Remains in danger of her former tooth.
But let the frame of things disjoint, both the worlds suffer,
Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep
In the affliction of these terrible dreams
That shake us nightly.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 15

Spoken by:
,

To bed, to bed. There's knocking at the gate

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To bed, to bed. There's knocking at the gate. Come, come, come, come. Give me your hand. What's done cannot be undone. To bed, to bed, to bed.
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line 69

Spoken by:

The Queen, my lord, is dead

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Seyton
The Queen, my lord, is dead.
Macbeth
She should have died hereafter.
There would have been a time for such a word.
Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time,
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death.
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 19

Spoken by:
,

Fetch hither the swain

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Armado
Fetch hither the swain. He must carry me a letter.
Boy
A message well sympathized—a horse to be ambassador for an ass.
Armado
Ha? Ha? What sayest thou?
Boy
Marry, sir, you must send the ass upon the horse, for he is very slow-gaited. But I go.
Armado
The way is but short.
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 50

Spoken by:
,

Connected Notes:
Learning By Living

I will something affect the letter, for it argues facility

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Holofernes
I will something affect the letter, for it argues facility.
The preyful princess pierced and pricked a pretty pleasing pricket,
Some say a sore, but not a sore till now made sore with shooting.
The dogs did yell. Put —l to —sore, then sorel jumps from thicket,
Or pricket sore, or else sorel. The people fall a-hooting.
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 2
Line 65

Spoken by:
, ,

We are wise girls to mock our lovers so

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Princess
We are wise girls to mock our lovers so.
Rosaline
They are worse fools to purchase mocking so.
That same Berowne I'll torture ere I go.
O, that I knew he were but in by th' week,
How I would make him fawn, and beg, and seek,
And wait the season, and observe the times,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 2
Line 63

Spoken by:
, ,

Themes:
,

Now, my young guest, methinks you're allycholly

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Host
Now, my young guest, methinks you're allycholly.
I pray you, why is it?
Julia, as Sebastian
Marry, mine host, because I
cannot be merry.
Host
Come, we'll have you merry. I'll bring you where
you shall hear music and see the gentleman that you
asked for.
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 2
Line 28

Spoken by:
, ,

Themes:
, , , , ,

Come, now a roundel and a fairy song

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Titania
Come, now a roundel and a fairy song;
Then, for the third part of a minute, hence—
Some to kill cankers in the muskrose buds,
Some war with reremice for their leathern wings
To make my small elves coats, and some keep back
The clamorous owl that nightly hoots and wonders
At our quaint spirits.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 1

Spoken by:
, ,

Themes:
,

Here's neither bush nor shrub to bear off any weather

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Trinculo
Here's neither bush nor shrub to bear off
any weather at all. And another storm brewing; I
hear it sing i' th' wind. Yond same black cloud, yond
huge one, looks like a foul bombard that would shed
his liquor. If it should thunder as it did before, I
know not where to hide my head.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 18

Spoken by:
, ,

Themes:
,

Fore God, you have here a goodly dwelling

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Falstaff
Fore God, you have here a goodly dwelling,
and a  rich.
Shallow
Barren, barren, barren, beggars all, beggars
all, Sir John. Marry, good air.—Spread, Davy,
spread, Davy. Well said, Davy.
Falstaff
This Davy serves you for good uses. He is
your servingman and your husband.
Shallow
A good varlet,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 3
Line 5

Spoken by:
, , ,

Themes:

Take thy lute, wench

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Queen Katherine
Take thy lute, wench. My soul grows sad with troubles.
Sing, and disperse 'em if thou canst. Leave working.
Woman sings 

Orpheus with his lute made trees
And the mountaintops that freeze
Bow themselves when he did sing.
To his music plants and flowers
Ever sprung,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 1

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
, ,

Stay. I prithee, tell me what thou think'st of me

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Olivia
Stay. I prithee, tell me what thou think'st of me.
Viola
That you do think you are not what you are.
Olivia
If I think so, I think the same of you.
Viola
Then think you right. I am not what I am.
Olivia
I would you were as I would have you be.
Viola
Would it be better,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 145

Spoken by:
,

Now, my fair'st friend

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Perdita, to Florizell
Now, my fair'st friend,
I would I had some flowers o' th' spring, that might
Become your time of day, (to the Shepherdesses)
and yours, and yours,
That wear upon your virgin branches yet
Your maidenheads growing. O Proserpina,
For the flowers now that, frighted, thou let'st fall
From Dis's wagon!
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 4
Line 134

Spoken by:
,

Fie, cousin Percy, how you cross my father!

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Mortimer
Fie, cousin Percy, how you cross my father!
Hotspur
I cannot choose. Sometime he angers me
With telling me of the moldwarp and the ant,
Of the dreamer Merlin and his prophecies,
And of a dragon and a finless fish,
A clip-winged griffin and a moulten raven,
A couching lion and a ramping cat,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 151

Spoken by:
, ,

The Prince of Wales stepped forth before the King

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Worcester
The Prince of Wales stepped forth before the King,
And, nephew, challenged you to single fight.
Hotspur
O, would the quarrel lay upon our heads,
And that no man might draw short breath today
But I and Harry Monmouth! Tell me, tell me,
How showed his tasking? Seemed it in contempt?
Vernon
No,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 2
Line 48

Spoken by:
, ,

I thought the King had more affected the Duke

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Kent
I thought the King had more affected the Duke
of Albany than Cornwall.
Gloucester
It did always seem so to us, but now in
the division of the kingdom, it appears not which
of the dukes he values most, for equalities are so
weighed that curiosity in neither can make choice
of either's moiety.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 1

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
, , ,

Connected Notes:
Lear Act One Scene One

Now, our joy, Although our last and least

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King Lear
Now, our joy,
Although our last and least, to whose young love
The vines of France and milk of Burgundy
Strive to be interessed, what can you say to draw
A third more opulent than your sisters'? Speak.
Cordelia
Nothing, my lord.
King Lear
Nothing?
Cordelia
Nothing.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 91

Spoken by:
, ,

Themes:
, , ,

Royal Lear, Whom I have ever honored as my king

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Kent
Royal Lear,
Whom I have ever honored as my king,
Loved as my father, as my master followed,
As my great patron thought on in my prayers—
King Lear
The bow is bent and drawn. Make from the shaft.
Kent
Let it fall rather, though the fork invade
The region of my heart.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 156

Spoken by:
,