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There's little of the melancholy element in her

There’s little of the melancholy element in
her, my lord. She is never sad but when she sleeps,
and not ever sad then,

Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 335

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In the most high and palmy state of Rome

In the most high and palmy state of Rome,
A little ere the mightiest Julius fell,
The graves stood tenantless and the sheeted dead
Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets.

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 124

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But to my mind, though I am native here

But to my mind, though I am native here
And to the manner born, it is a custom
More honor’d in the breach than the observance.

Source:
Act 1
Scene 4
Line 16

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Not a whit, we defy augury

Not a whit, we defy augury. There is special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now,

Source:
Act 5
Scene 2

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Brutus, I do observe you now of late

Cassius
Brutus, I do observe you now of late;
I have not from your eyes that gentleness
And show of love as I was wont to have.

Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 37

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Romans, countrymen, and lovers, hear me for my cause

Marcus Brutus
Romans, countrymen, and lovers,Exordium hear me for my cause,

Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 14

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Do not presume too much upon my love

Cassius
Do not presume too much upon my love,
I may do that I shall be sorry for.

Source:
Act 4
Scene 3
Line 72

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A friend should bear his friend’s infirmities

Cassius
A friend should bear his friend’s infirmities;
But Brutus makes mine greater than they are.

Source:
Act 4
Scene 3
Line 96

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But soft, what light through yonder window breaks?

Romeo
But soft, what light through yonder window breaks?

It is the East, and Juliet is the sun.

Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 2

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On fair ground I could beat forty of them

Coriolanus
On fair ground
I could beat forty of them.
Menenius Agrippa
I could myself
Take up a brace o’ th’ best of them,

Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 308

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Be absolute for death

Vincentio, the Duke
Be absolute for death: either death or life
Shall thereby be the sweeter.

Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 5

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The sense of death is most in apprehension

Isabella
The sense of death is most in apprehension,
And the poor beetle that we tread upon
In corporal sufferance finds a pang as great
As when a giant dies.

Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 85

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Sir, I know him, and I love him

Lucio
Sir, I know him, and I love him.
Vincentio, the Duke
Love talks with better knowledge,

Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 151

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O how full of briers is this working-day world!

Rosalind
O, how full of briers is this working-day world!
Celia
They are but burs,

Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 11

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Thou seest we are not all alone unhappy

Duke Senior
Thou seest we are not all alone unhappy:
This wide and universal theatre
Presents more woeful pageants than the scene
Wherein we play in.

Source:
Act 2
Scene 7
Line 136

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O most delicate fiend!

O most delicate fiend!
Who is’t can read a woman?

Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 47

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The fingers of the powers above

Soothsayer
The fingers of the powers above do tune
The harmony of this peace.Synecdoche and Metaphor
The vision
Which I made known to Lucius ere the stroke
Of this yet scarce-cold battle at this instant
Is full accomplished.

Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 566

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Thus hath the candle singed the moth

Portia
Thus hath the candle singed the moth
O, these deliberate fools, when they do choose,

Source:
Act 2
Scene 9
Line 85

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Ah, Lucius, for thy brothers let me plead

Titus Andronicus
Ah, Lucius, for thy brothers let me plead.—
Grave tribunes, once more I entreat of you—
Lucius
My gracious lord,

Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 30

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Sooner this sword shall plow thy bowels up!

Aaron, taking the baby  
Sooner this sword shall plow thy bowels up!
Stay,

Source:
Act 4
Scene 2
Line 91

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You sad-faced men, people and sons of Rome

You sad-faced men, people and sons of Rome,
By uproars severed as a flight of fowl
Scattered by winds and high tempestuous gusts,

Source:
Act 5
Scene 3
Line 68

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I would not be thy executioner

I would not be thy executioner.
I fly thee, for I would not injure thee.
Thou tell’st me there is murder in mine eye.

Source:
Act 3
Scene 5
Line 9

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We have scorched the snake, not killed it

Macbeth
We have scorched the snake, not killed it.
She’ll close and be herself whilst our poor malice
Remains in danger of her former tooth.

Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 15

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To bed, to bed. There’s knocking at the gate

To bed, to bed. There’s knocking at the gate. Come, come, come, come. Give me your hand. What’s done cannot be undone.

Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line 69

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The Queen, my lord, is dead

Seyton
The Queen, my lord, is dead.
Macbeth
She should have died hereafter.

Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 19

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Fetch hither the swain

Armado
Fetch hither the swain. He must carry me a letter.
Boy
A message well sympathized—a horse to be ambassador for an ass.

Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 50

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I will something affect the letter, for it argues facility

Holofernes
I will something affect the letter, for it argues facility.
The preyful princess pierced and pricked a pretty pleasing pricket,

Source:
Act 4
Scene 2
Line 65

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We are wise girls to mock our lovers so

Princess
We are wise girls to mock our lovers so.
Rosaline
They are worse fools to purchase mocking so.

Source:
Act 5
Scene 2
Line 63

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Now, my young guest, methinks you’re allycholly

Host
Now, my young guest, methinks you’re allycholly.
I pray you, why is it?
Julia,

Source:
Act 4
Scene 2
Line 28

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Come, now a roundel and a fairy song

Titania
Come, now a roundel and a fairy song;
Then, for the third part of a minute,

Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 1

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Here’s neither bush nor shrub to bear off any weather

Trinculo
Here’s neither bush nor shrub to bear off
any weather at all. And another storm brewing;

Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 18

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Fore God, you have here a goodly dwelling

Falstaff
Fore God, you have here a goodly dwelling,
and a  rich.
Shallow
Barren,

Source:
Act 5
Scene 3
Line 5

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Take thy lute, wench

Queen Katherine
Take thy lute, wench. My soul grows sad with troubles.
Sing, and disperse ’em if thou canst.

Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 1

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Stay. I prithee, tell me what thou think’st of me

Olivia
Stay. I prithee, tell me what thou think’st of me.
Viola
That you do think you are not what you are.

Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 145

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Now, my fair’st friend

Perdita, to Florizell
Now, my fair’st friend,
I would I had some flowers o’ th’ spring,

Source:
Act 4
Scene 4
Line 134

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Fie, cousin Percy, how you cross my father!

Mortimer
Fie, cousin Percy, how you cross my father!
Hotspur
I cannot choose.

Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 151

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The Prince of Wales stepped forth before the King

Worcester
The Prince of Wales stepped forth before the King,
And, nephew, challenged you to single fight.

Source:
Act 5
Scene 2
Line 48

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I thought the King had more affected the Duke

Kent
I thought the King had more affected the Duke
of Albany than Cornwall.
Gloucester
It did always seem so to us,

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 1

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Now, our joy, Although our last and least

King Lear
Now, our joy,
Although our last and least, to whose young love
The vines of France and milk of Burgundy
Strive to be interessed,

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 91

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Royal Lear, Whom I have ever honored as my king

Kent
Royal Lear,
Whom I have ever honored as my king,
Loved as my father,

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 156

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This is most strange

France
This is most strange,
That she whom even but now was your best object,
The argument of your praise,

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 245

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Nuncle, give me an egg

Fool
Nuncle, give me
an egg, and I’ll give thee two crowns.
King Lear
What two crowns shall they be?

Source:
Act 1
Scene 4
Line 159

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Yet better thus, and known to be contemned

Edgar
Yet better thus, and known to be contemned,
Than still contemned and flattered. To be worst,

Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 1

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O, my dear father

Cordelia, kissing Lear
O, my dear father, restoration hang
Thy medicine on my lips,

Source:
Act 4
Scene 7
Line 31

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Let Rome in Tiber melt

Antony
Let Rome in Tiber melt and the wide arch
Of the ranged empire fall. Here is my space.

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 38

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The legate of the Pope hath been with me

King John
The legate of the Pope hath been with me,
And I have made a happy peace with him,

Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line 63

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Adieu, uncle

Cressida
Adieu, uncle.
Pandarus
I will be with you, niece, by and by.

Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 284

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Have you seen my cousin?

Pandarus
Have you seen my cousin?
Troilus
No, Pandarus. I stalk about her door
Like a strange soul upon the Stygian banks
Staying for waftage.

Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 6

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Wilt thou aspire to guide the heavenly car

Wilt thou aspire to guide the heavenly car,
And with thy daring folly burn the world?
Wilt thou reach stars,

Source:
Act 3
Scene 1

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A goodly medicine for my aching bones!

A goodly medicine for my aching bones!
O world, world, world ! Thus is the poor agent despised.
O traitors and bawds,

Source:
Act 5
Scene 11
Line 37

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