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Troilus

Well, I have told you enough of this

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Pandarus
Well, I have told you enough of this. For my
part, I’ll not meddle nor make no farther. He that will
have a cake out of the wheat must tarry the grinding.
Troilus
Have I not tarried?
Pandarus
Ay, the grinding; but you must tarry the bolting.
Troilus
Have I not tarried?
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 13

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Spoken by:
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O, Pandarus! I tell thee, Pandarus

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O, Pandarus! I tell thee, Pandarus:
When I do tell thee there my hopes lie drowned,
Reply not in how many fathoms deep
They lie indrenched. I tell thee I am mad
In Cressid’s love. Thou answer’st she is fair;
Pourest in the open ulcer of my heart
Her eyes, her hair, her cheek, her gait, her voice;
Handiest in thy discourse—O—that her hand,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 49

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Fie, fie, my brother, Weigh you the worth and honor of a king

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Troilus
Fie, fie, my brother,
Weigh you the worth and honor of a king
So great as our dread father’s in a scale
Of common ounces? Will you with counters sum
The past-proportion of his infinite,
And buckle in a waist most fathomless
With spans and inches so diminutive
As fears and reasons? Fie, for godly shame!
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 26

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Spoken by:
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Brother, she is not worth what she doth cost

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Hector
Brother, she is not worth what she doth cost
The keeping.
Troilus
What’s aught but as ’tis valued?
Hector
But value dwells not in particular will;
It holds his estimate and dignity
As well wherein ’tis precious of itself
As in the prizer. ‘Tis mad idolatry
To make the service greater than the god;
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 54

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Spoken by:
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Have you seen my cousin?

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Pandarus
Have you seen my cousin?
Troilus
No, Pandarus. I stalk about her door
Like a strange soul upon the Stygian banks
Staying for waftage. O, be thou my Charon,
And give me swift transportance to those fields
Where I may wallow in the lily beds
Proposed for the deserver! O, gentle Pandar,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 6

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Spoken by:
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Themes:

Will you walk in, my lord?

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Cressida
Will you walk in, my lord?
Troilus
O Cressid, how often have I wished me thus!
Cressida
“Wished,” my lord? The gods grant—O, my lord!
Troilus
What should they grant? What makes this
pretty abruption? What too-curious dreg espies
my sweet lady in the fountain of our love?
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 61

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Spoken by:
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Boldness comes to me now and brings me heart

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Cressida
Boldness comes to me now and brings me heart.
Prince Troilus, I have loved you night and day
For many weary months.
Troilus
Why was my Cressid then so hard to win?
Cressida
Hard to seem won; but I was won, my lord,
With the first glance that ever—pardon me;
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 113

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What offends you, lady?

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Troilus
What offends you, lady?
Cressida
Sir, mine own company.
Troilus
You cannot shun yourself.
Cressida
Let me go and try.
I have a kind of self resides with you,
But an unkind self that itself will leave
To be another’s fool. I would be gone.
Where is my wit?
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 144

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Spoken by:
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And is it true that I must go from Troy?

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Cressida
And is it true that I must go from Troy?
Troilus
A hateful truth.
Cressida
What, and from Troilus too?
Troilus
From Troy and Troilus.
Cressida
Is ‘t possible?

We two, that with so many thousand sighs
Did buy each other, must poorly sell ourselves
With the rude brevity and discharge of one.
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 4
Line 30

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Spoken by:
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Themes:
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A woeful Cressid ‘mongst the merry Greeks

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Cressida
A woeful Cressid ‘mongst the merry Greeks.
When shall we see again?
Troilus
Hear me, my  love. Be thou but true of heart—
Cressida
I true? How now, what wicked deem is this?
Troilus
Nay, we must use expostulation kindly,
For it is parting from us.
I speak not “Be thou true”
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 4
Scene 4
Line 59

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Spoken by:
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