Shakespeare quotes, notes, timelines & more

Home » Reading Will » Figures of Speech » Characters » Juliet

Juliet

Romeo and Juliet

You and Thee

Read the Note

In Henry IV Part 1, in the exchange between Hotspur and Owen Glendower, about calling up devils from the vasty deep, Hotspur deliberately shifts from the word you to thee when he addresses Glendower. You was often used to convey respect while thee was used when speaking to someone of inferior rank,
… continue reading this note

A Plague and a Scourge

Read the Note

Mercutio’s curse, “A plague o’ both your houses!” is fulfilled, although not literally. Despite the numerous ways scores of characters die in Shakespeare’s plays, no one in this play or any other Shakespeare play dies of the plague. But the plague is the proximate cause of Romeo’s and Juliet’s deaths.  When Friar Lawrence sends Friar John to deliver a letter to Romeo telling him of Juliet’s fake death,
… continue reading this note

Tombs and Wombs

Read the Note

Friar Lawrence’s rumination on soil as both a tomb and a womb works as a metaphor of one of the play’s central themes. The “misadventure’d piteous overthrows” of  Romeo and Juliet in the Capulet tomb at the end of the play gave birth to a growth of amity between their two families.
… continue reading this note

Caves, Temples & Palaces

Read the Note

Juliet’s biting reference to Romeo as “a gorgeous palace,” when she hears that Romeo has killed her cousin, contrasts with Romeo’s earlier reference to Juliet as “this holy shrine.” Both metaphors are echoed about fifteen years later near the end of Shakespeare’s career when Miranda in The Tempest speaks of Ferdinand in a similar figure of speech.
… continue reading this note

Richard III and the Sonnet

Read the Note

“Now is the winter of our discontent” is nearly as familiar as Hamlet’s, “To be, or not to be” and Mark Antony’s, “Friends, Romans, countrymen”. Not one of these three passages is a dramatic dialogue. Mark Antony addresses a large Roman crowd in an extended speech. Hamlet muses to himself in a soliloquy while we the audience listen in. Richard, however,
… continue reading this note

Birds — Martial and Marital

Read the Note

In Hamlet (1.1.432), a cock trumpets in the morn, a bird more fitting to the combative nature of Hamlet than the lark that heralds the morn after the first night of marital bliss in Romeo and Juliet (3.5.6).
… continue reading this note

Sonnets in Romeo and Juliet

Read the Note

Shakespeare, who had begun writing his sonnets sometime in the 1590’s, decided that the form would be useful in Romeo and Juliet. In fact, he wrote four sonnets in the play. The first, spoken by a chorus, opens Act 1. The second appears in Act 1, Scene 5, and it is dialogue spoken by Romeo and Juliet.
… continue reading this note

If I profane with my unworthiest hand

Read the Sonnet

Romeo
If I profane with my unworthiest hand
This holy shrineMetaphor, the gentle sinOxymoron is this,
My lips, two blushing pilgrimsMetaphor, ready stand
To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.
Juliet
Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,
Which mannerly devotion shows in this:
For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do touch,
And palm to palm is holy palmers' kissAntanaclesis or Paronomasia.
Romeo
Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?
Juliet
Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in pray'r.
Romeo
O then, dear saint, let lips do what hands do,
They pray—grant thou, lest faith turn to despair.
Juliet
Saints do not move, though grant for prayers' sake.
Romeo
Then move not while my prayer's effect I take.
(Kisses her)
Thus from my lips, by thine, my sin is purg'd.
Juliet
Then have my lips the sin that they have took.
Romeo
Sin from my lips? O trespass sweetly urg'd!

Source:
Act 1
Scene 5
Line 104

Source Type:
,

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:
, , , , ,

Connected Notes:
Sonnets in Romeo and Juliet, Caves, Temples & Palaces

My only love sprung from my only hate!

Read the Quote

My only love sprung from my only hate!Paradox
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!Epanalepsis
Prodigious birth of love it is to me
That I must love a loathèd enemy.Irony

… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 5
Line 152

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
, ,

But soft, what light through yonder window breaks?

Read the Quote

Romeo
But soft, what light through yonder window breaks?

It is the East, and Juliet is the sun.
Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon,
Who is already sick and pale with grief
That thou, her maid, art far more fair than she.

See how she leans her cheek upon her hand.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 2

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Connected Notes:
You and Thee

O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?

Read the Quote

Juliet
O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I’ll no longer be a Capulet.

That which we call a rose
By any other word would smell as sweet

Romeo, aside
Shall I hear more,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 36

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
, ,

Figures of Speech:

Connected Notes:
You and Thee

Lady, by yonder blessèd moon I vow

Read the Quote

Romeo 
Lady, by yonder blessèd moon I vow,
That tips with silver all these fruit-tree tops—
Juliet
O, swear not by the moon, th’ inconstant moon,
That monthly changes in her circled orb,
Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 112

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
, ,

My bounty is as boundless as the sea

Read the Quote

My bounty is as boundless as the sea,Simili
My love as deep;Ellipsis the more I give to thee,
The more I have,Anaphora, Paradox
for both are infinite.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 140

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:

Figures of Speech:
, , ,

Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow

Read the Quote

Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow,
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast!Ellipsis
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 199

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Figures of Speech:

Now, good sweet nurse

Read the Quote

Juliet
Now, good sweet nurse—O Lord, why lookest thou sad?
Though news be sad, yet tell them merrily.
If good, thou shamest the music of sweet news
By playing it to me with so sour a face.
Nurse
I am aweary. Give me leave awhile.
Fie, how my bones ache! What a jaunt have I!
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 5
Line 21

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

These violent delights have violent ends

Read the Quote

Friar Lawrence
These violent delights have violent ends,
And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
Which as they kiss consume.Simili
The sweetest honey
Is loathsome in his own deliciousness,
And in the taste confounds the appetite.Metaphor

Therefore love moderately: long love doth so;
Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 6
Line 9

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
,

Connected Notes:
Plagiarizing Himself

Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds

Read the Quote

Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds,
Towards Phoebus’ lodging. Such a wagoner
As Phaëton would whip you to the west
And bring in cloudy night immediately.
Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night,
That runaways’ eyes may wink, and Romeo
Leap to these arms, untalked of and unseen.
Lovers can see to do their amorous rites
By their own beauties,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:

Themes:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , ,