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Horatio

Tush, tush, ’twill not appear

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Horatio 
Tush, tush, ’twill not appear.Alliteration & Epizeuxis
Barnardo
Sit down awhile,
And let us once again assail your ears,
That are so fortified against our story,Synecdoche & Assonance

What we have two nights seen.Anastrophe

Before my God,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 35

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In the most high and palmy state of Rome

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In the most high and palmy state of Rome,
A little ere the mightiest Julius fell,
The graves stood tenantless, and the sheeted dead
Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets.
As stars with trains of fire, and dews of blood,
Disasters in the sun; and the moist star,
Upon whose influence Neptune’s empire stands,
Was sick almost to doomsday with eclipse.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 124

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But soft, behold! Lo where it comes again!

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But soft, behold! Lo, where it comes again!
I’ll cross it though it blast me. Stay, illusion!
It spreads his arms.

If thou art privy to thy country’s fate,
Which happily foreknowing may avoid,
O, speak!

If thou hast any sound or use of voice,
Speak to me.
If there be any good thing to be done
That may to thee Hendiadysdo ease and grace to me,

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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 138

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It was about to speak when the cock crew

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Barnardo
It was about to speak when the cock crew.
Horatio
And then it started like a guilty thing
Upon a fearful summons.Simile
I have heard
The cock, that is the trumpet to the mornMetaphor,
Doth with his lofty and shrill-sounding throat
Awake the god of day,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 162

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Connected Notes:
Seasons, Elements and Humors, Birds — Martial and Marital

Thrift, thrift, Horatio

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Hamlet 
Thrift, thrift, Horatio.Epizeuxis The funeral baked meats
Did coldly furnish forth the marriage tables.Alliteration
Would I had met my dearest foe in heaven
Or ever I had seen that day, Horatio!
My father—methinks I see my father.

He was a man. Take him for all in all,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 187

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It will not speak. Then I will follow it

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Hamlet
It will not speak. Then I will follow it.
Horatio
Do not, my lord.
Hamlet
Why, what should be the fear?
I do not set my life at a pin’s fee.
And for my soul, what can it do to that,
Being a thing immortal as itself?
It waves me forth again.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 4
Line 70

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O day and night, but this is wondrous strange!

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Horatio
O day and night, but this is wondrous strange.
Hamlet
And therefore as a stranger give it welcome.
There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy. But come.

There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy

Here,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 5
Line 185

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Here, sweet lord, at your service

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Horatio
Here, sweet lord, at your service.
Hamlet
Horatio, thou art e’en as just a man
As e’er my conversation coped withal.
Horatio
O, my dear lord—

Give me that man
That is not passion’s slave, and I will wear him
In my heart’s core, ay, in my heart of heart

Hamlet
Nay,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 2
Line 55

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I will not speak with her

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Queen Gertrude
I will not speak with her.
Gentleman
She is importunate,
Indeed distract; her mood will needs be pitied.
Queen Gertrude
What would she have?

So full of artless jealousy is guilt,
It spills itself in fearing to be spilt.

Gentleman
She speaks much of her father,
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 5
Line 1

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Why may not that be the skull of a lawyer?

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Hamlet
Why may not that be the
skull of a lawyer? Where be his quiddities now, his
quillities, his cases, his tenures, and his tricks? Why
does he suffer this mad knave now to knock him
about the sconce with a dirty shovel and will not tell
him of his action of battery?

Is this the fine of his fines and the
recovery of his recoveries,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line 100

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