Shakespeare quotes, notes, timelines & more

Home » Reading Will » Figures of Speech » Characters » Gratiano

Gratiano

The Sadness of the Merchant

Read the Note

In the opening lines of The Merchant of Venice, the young merchant Antonio is questioned by his friends about his sadness. His friends Salarino, Solanio and Gratiano attempt to determine why Antonio is sad. Antonio denies that his sadness is about his concern for his investments in merchandise at sea. When asked if his melancholy is because he is in love,
… continue reading this note

Better Angels

Read the Note

The only mention in any of Shakespeare’s plays of the “better angel” is in Othello (5.2.235), when Gratiano, speaking over Desdemona’s body, speaks of her father:

Did he live now,
This sight would make him do a desperate turn,
Yea, curse his better angel from his side,

Shakespeare makes another mention of the “better angel”
… continue reading this note

Appearance and Prejudice

Read the Note

One of Shakespeare’s most frequent themes is appearance versus reality. This theme manifests itself in different ways for different purposes. In Merchant of Venice (2.2.181), Bassanio says to Gratiano:

Thou art too wild, too rude and bold of voice—
Parts that become thee happily enough,
And in such eyes as ours appear not faults.
… continue reading this note

You look not well, Signior Antonio

Read the Quote

Gratiano
You look not well, Signior Antonio.
You have too much respect upon the world.
They lose it that do buy it with much care.
Believe me, you are marvelously changed.
Antonio

I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano,
A stage where every man must play a part,
And mine a sad one.

… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 77

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , ,

Connected Notes:
The Sadness of the Merchant

Why then you must. But hear thee, Gratiano

Read the Quote

Bassanio
Why then you must. But hear thee, Gratiano,
Thou art too wild, too rude and bold of voice—
Parts that become thee happily enough,
And in such eyes as oursSynecdoche appear not faults.
But where thou art not known—why, there they show
Something too liberal. Pray thee take pain
To allay with some cold drops of modesty
PersonificationThy skipping spirit,

… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 181

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Figures of Speech:
, , , ,

Connected Notes:
Appearance and Prejudice

And it is marvel he outdwells his hour

Read the Quote

Gratiano
And it is marvel he outdwells his hour,
For lovers ever run before the clock.
Salarino
O, ten times faster Venus’ pigeons fly
To seal love’s bonds new-made than they are wont
To keep obligèd faith unforfeited.
Gratiano
That ever holds. Who riseth from a feast
With that keen appetite that he sits down?
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 2
Scene 6
Line 4

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Why dost thou whet thy knife so earnestly?

Read the Quote

Gratiano
Why dost thou whet thy knife so earnestly?
Shylock
To cut the forfeiture from that bankrout there.
Gratiano
Not on thy sole but on thy soul, harsh Jew,
Thou mak’st thy knife keen. But no metal can,
No, not the hangman’s axe, bear half the keenness
Of thy sharp envy.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 123

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

O, O, O!

Read the Quote

Othello
O, O, O!
Othello falls on the bed.
Emilia
Nay, lay thee down, and roar!
For thou hast killed the sweetest innocent
That e’er did lift up eye.
Othello, standing
O, she was foul!—
I scarce did know you, uncle. There lies your niece,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 5
Scene 2
Line 235

Source Type:

Spoken by:
, ,

Themes:
, , ,

Connected Notes:
Better Angels