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Enobarbus

What’s your pleasure, sir?

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Enobarbus
What’s your pleasure, sir?
Antony
I must with haste from hence.
Enobarbus
Why then we kill all our women. We see
how mortal an unkindness is to them. If they suffer
our departure, death’s the word.
Antony
I must be gone.
Enobarbus
Under a compelling occasion,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 146

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Why, sir, give the gods a thankful sacrifice

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Enobarbus
Why, sir, give the gods a thankful sacrifice.
When it pleaseth their deities to take the wife of a
man from him, it shows to man the tailors of the
Earth; comforting therein, that when old robes are
worn out, there are members to make new. If there
were no more women but Fulvia, then had you
indeed a cut,
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 2
Line 192

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

When she first met Mark Antony

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Enobarbus
When she first met Mark Antony, she
pursed up his heart upon the river of Cydnus.
Agrippa
There she appeared indeed, or my reporter
devised well for her.
Enobarbus
I will tell you.
The barge she sat in like a burnished throne
Burned on the water. The poop was beaten gold,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 222

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Age cannot wither her

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Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale
Her infinite variety. Other women cloy
The appetites they feed, but she makes hungry
Where most she satisfies. For vilest things
Become themselves in her, that the holy priests
Bless her when she is riggish.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 2
Line 276

Source Type:

Spoken by:

You have done well by water

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Enobarbus
You have done well by water.
Menas
And you by land.
Enobarbus
I will praise any man that will praise me,
though it cannot be denied what I have done by land.
Menas
Nor what I have done by water.
Enobarbus
Yes, something you can deny for your own
safety: you have been a great thief by sea.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 6
Line 113

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Caesar’s sister is called Octavia

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Enobarbus
Caesar’s sister is called Octavia.
Menas
True, sir. She was the wife of Caius Marcellus.
Enobarbus
But she is now the wife of Marcus Antonius.
Menas
Pray you, sir?
Enobarbus
‘Tis true.
Menas
Then is Caesar and he forever knit together.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 6
Line 139

Source Type:

Spoken by:
,

Ha, my brave emperor, Shall we dance

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Enobarbus, to Antony
Ha, my brave emperor,
Shall we dance now the Egyptian bacchanals
And celebrate our drink?
Pompey
Let’s ha ‘t, good soldier.
Antony
Come, let’s all take hands
Till that the conquering wine hath steeped our sense
In soft and delicate Lethe.
Enobarbus
All take hands.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 7
Line 121

Source Type:
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Spoken by:
, , , ,

Come, let’s all take hands

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Antony
Come, let’s all take hands
Till that the conquering wine hath steeped our sense
In soft and delicate Lethe.
Enobarbus
All take hands.
Make battery to our ears with the loud music,
The while I’ll place you; then the boy shall sing.
The holding every man shall beat as loud
As his strong sides can volley.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 7
Line 125

Source Type:
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Spoken by:
, , ,

Themes:

Naught, naught, all naught!

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Enobarbus 
Naught, naught, all naught! I can behold no longer.
Th’ Antoniad, the Egyptian admiral,
With all their sixty, fly and turn the rudder.Hysteron-Proteron

To see ’t mine eyes are blasted.
  Enter Scarus.
Scarus
Gods and goddesses,
All the whole synod of them!
Enobarbus
What’s thy passion?
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 10
Line 1

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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Figures of Speech:
, , ,

To him again. Tell him he wears the rose

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Antony, to Ambassador
To him again. Tell him he wears the rose
Of youth upon him, from which the world should note
Something particular: his coin, ships, legions
May be a coward’s, whose ministers would prevail
Under the service of a child as soon
As i’ th’ command of Caesar. I dare him therefore
To lay his gay caparisons apart
And answer me declined,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 13
Line 25

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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