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Duke of York

Learning by Living

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In Love’s Labors Lost, Armado’s exclamation about the boy’s “Sweet smoke of rhetoric” complements the boy’s previous remark about his “penny of observation.” These two metaphors capture Shakespeare’s genius, both to observe and to poetically express human nature. In Love’s Labor’s Lost, the country boy, not the nobility, possesses these qualities.
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She-wolf of France, but worse than wolves of France

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She-wolf of France, but worse than wolves of France,
Whose Synecdochetongue more poisons than the adder’s tooth:Metaphor, Diacope & Parenthesis

How ill-beseeming is it in thy sex
To triumph like an Amazonian trull
Upon their woes whom Fortune captivates.Simile

O, tiger’s heart wrapped in a woman’s hide,
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Will the King come, that I may breathe my last

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Gaunt
Will the King come, that I may breathe my last
In wholesome counsel to his unstaid youth?
York
Vex not yourself nor strive not with your breath,
For all in vain comes counsel to his ear.

This blessèd plot, this earth, this realm, this England,
This nurse, this teeming womb of royal kings,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 1

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The King is come. Deal mildly with his youth

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York
The King is come. Deal mildly with his youth,
For young hot colts being reined do rage the more.
Queen, to Gaunt
How fares our noble uncle Lancaster?
King Richard, to Gaunt
What comfort, man? How is ’t with agèd Gaunt?

A thousand flatterers sit within thy crown,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 75

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My liege, old Gaunt commends him to your Majesty

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Northumberland
My liege, old Gaunt commends him to your Majesty.
King Richard
What says he?
Northumberland
Nay, nothing; all is said.
His tongue is now a stringless instrument;
Words, life, and all, old Lancaster hath spent.
York
Be York the next that must be bankrupt so!
Though death be poor,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 1
Line 154

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Show me thy humble heart and not thy knee

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York
Show me thy humble heart and not thy knee,
Whose duty is deceivable and false.
Bolingbroke, standing
My gracious uncle—

Grace me no grace, nor uncle me no uncle.
I am no traitor’s uncle, and that word “grace”
In an ungracious mouth is but profane.

York
Tut,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 3
Line 87

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My lords of England, let me tell you this

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York
My lords of England, let me tell you this:
I have had feeling of my cousin’s wrongs
And labored all I could to do him right.
But in this kind to come, in braving arms,
Be his own carver and cut out his way
To find out right with wrong, it may not be.
And you that do abet him in this kind
Cherish rebellion and are rebels all.
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 3
Line 156

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I pray you, uncle, give me this dagger

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York
I pray you, uncle, give me this dagger.
Richard
My dagger, little cousin? With all my heart.
Prince
A beggar, brother?
York
Of my kind uncle, that I know will give,
And being but a toy, which is no grief to give.

To mitigate the scorn he gives his uncle,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 112

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Great Duke of Lancaster, I come to thee

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York
Great Duke of Lancaster, I come to thee
From plume-plucked Richard, who with willing soul
Adopts thee heir, and his high scepter yields
To the possession of thy royal hand.
Ascend his throne, descending now from him,
And long live Henry, fourth of that name!

O, if you raise this house against this house,
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 112

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Alack, why am I sent for to a king

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King Richard
Alack, why am I sent for to a king
Before I have shook off the regal thoughts
Wherewith I reigned? I hardly yet have learned
To insinuate, flatter, bow, and bend my knee.

Did they not sometime cry “All hail” to me?
So Judas did to Christ, but He in twelve
Found truth in all but one;
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Source:
Act 4
Scene 1
Line 170

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Alack, poor Richard! Where rode he the whilst?

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Duchess
Alack, poor Richard! Where rode he the whilst?
York
As in a theater the eyes of men,
After a well-graced actor leaves the stage,
Are idly bent on him that enters next,

But heaven hath a hand in these events,
To whose high will we bound our calm contents.

Thinking his prattle to be tedious,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 2
Line 24

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