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Dromio of Syracuse

Comedy of Errors

Love and Water

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The Comedy of Error’s concluding dialogue between Dromio of Ephesus and Dromio of Syracuse neatly ties up an underlying theme of this farce, that true love — brotherly, marital or other — renders the lovers indistinguishable, “Methinks you are my glass, and not my brother.” But this metaphor of the mirror at the end of the play is a shift from the similes of drops of water that recurred previously.
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Seasons, Elements and Humors

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The four seasons, the four elements and the four humors were all related. The four seasons spring, summer, autumn and winter paralleled the four humors blood/sanguine, yellow bile/choleric, phlegm/phlegmatic and black bile/melancholic, which in turn paralleled the four elements air, fire, water and earth. Good health and good disposition of character or personality were believed to be a matter of keeping one’s humors in proper balance.
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Was there ever any man thus beaten out of season

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Was there ever any man thus beaten out of season,
When in the why and the whereforeAlliteration is neither rhyme nor reason?Alliteration
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 3
Line 50

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Seasons, Elements and Humors

Go, fetch me something. I’ll break ope the gate.

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Antipholus of Ephesus
Go, fetch me something. I’ll break ope the gate.
Dromio of Syracuse, within
Break any breaking here, and I’ll break your knave’s pate.
Dromio of Ephesus
A man may break a word with you, sir, and words are but wind,
Ay, and break it in your face,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 115

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Methinks you are my glass, and not my brother

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Dromio of Ephesus
Methinks you are my glass, and not my brother:
I see by you I am a sweet-fac’d youth.
Will you walk in to see their gossiping?
Dromio of Syracuse
Not I, sir, you are my elder.
Dromio of Ephesus
That’s a question; how shall we try it?
Dromio of Syracuse
We’ll draw cuts for the senior,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line 430

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Love and Water