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Dromio of Ephesus

Love and Water

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The Comedy of Error’s concluding dialogue between Dromio of Ephesus and Dromio of Syracuse neatly ties up an underlying theme of this farce, that true love — brotherly, marital or other — renders the lovers indistinguishable, “Methinks you are my glass, and not my brother.” But this metaphor of the mirror at the end of the play is a shift from the similes of drops of water that recurred previously.
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But here’s a villain that would face me down

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Antipholus Of Ephesus
But here’s a villain that would face me down
He met me on the mart, and that I beat him
And charged him with a thousand marks in gold,
And that I did deny my wife and house.—
Thou drunkard, thou, what didst thou mean by this?
Dromio of Ephesus
Say what you will,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 6

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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Themes:

Go, fetch me something. I’ll break ope the gate.

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Antipholus of Ephesus
Go, fetch me something. I’ll break ope the gate.
Dromio of Syracuse, within
Break any breaking here, and I’ll break your knave’s pate.
Dromio of Ephesus
A man may break a word with you, sir, and words are but wind,
Ay, and break it in your face,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 115

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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Themes:

Figures of Speech:
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Methinks you are my glass, and not my brother

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Dromio of Ephesus
Methinks you are my glass, and not my brother:
I see by you I am a sweet-fac’d youth.
Will you walk in to see their gossiping?
Dromio of Syracuse
Not I, sir, you are my elder.
Dromio of Ephesus
That’s a question; how shall we try it?
Dromio of Syracuse
We’ll draw cuts for the senior,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 1
Line 430

Source Type:

Spoken by:
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Connected Notes:
Love and Water