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Cymbeline

Love and Water

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The Comedy of Error’s concluding dialogue between Dromio of Ephesus and Dromio of Syracuse neatly ties up an underlying theme of this farce, that true love — brotherly, marital or other — renders the lovers indistinguishable, “Methinks you are my glass, and not my brother.” But this metaphor of the mirror at the end of the play is a shift from the similes of drops of water that recurred previously.
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Stand by my side, you whom the gods have made Preservers of my throne

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Cymbeline
Stand by my side, you whom the gods have made
Preservers of my throne. Woe is my heart
That the poor soldier that so richly fought,
Whose rags sham’d gilded arms, whose naked breast
Stepp’d before targes of proof, cannot be found.
He shall be happy that can find him, if
Our grace can make him so.
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 1

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,

By med’cine life may be prolong’d

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By med’cine life may be prolong’d, yet death
Will seize the doctor too. How ended she?
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 29

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O most delicate fiend!

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O most delicate fiend!
Who is’t can read a woman?
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 47

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Mine eyes Were not in fault

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Mine eyes
Were not in fault, for she was beautiful;
Mine ears, that heard her flattery, nor my heart,
That thought her like her seeming. It had been vicious
To have mistrusted her; yet, O my daughter,
That it was folly in me, thou mayst say,
And prove it in thy feeling. Heaven mend all!
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 62

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Upon a time—unhappy was the clock

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Jachimo
Upon a time—unhappy was the clock
That strook the hour!—it was in Rome—accurs’d
The mansion where!—’twas at a feast—O would
Our viands had been poison’d, or at least
Those which I heav’d to head!—the good Posthumus
(What should I say? He was too good to be
Where ill men were, and was the best of all
Amongst the rar’st of good ones),
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 153

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Spoken by:
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Methinks I see him now—

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Jachimo
Methinks I see him now—
Posthumus Leonatus
Advancing.
Ay, so thou dost,
Italian fiend! Ay me, most credulous fool,
Egregious murderer, thief, any thing
That’s due to all the villains past, in being,
To come! O, give me cord, or knife, or poison,
Some upright justicer! Thou, King, send out
For torturers ingenious;
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 209

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The fingers of the powers above

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Soothsayer
The fingers of the powers above do tune
The harmony of this peace.Synecdoche and Metaphor
The vision
Which I made known to Lucius ere the stroke
Of this yet scarce-cold battle at this instant
Is full accomplished. For the Roman eagle,Metonymy
From south to west on wing soaring aloft,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 566

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Spoken by:
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Themes:
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Figures of Speech:
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Connected Notes:
Love and Water