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Cymbeline

Love and Water

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The Comedy of Error’s concluding dialogue between Dromio of Ephesus and Dromio of Syracuse neatly ties up an underlying theme of this farce, that true love — brotherly, marital or other — renders the lovers indistinguishable, “Methinks you are my glass, and not my brother.” But this metaphor of the mirror at the end of the play is a shift from the similes of drops of water that recurred previously.
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Should we be taking leave

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Posthumus
Should we be taking leave
As long a term as yet we have to live,
The loathness to depart would grow. Adieu.

There cannot be a pinch in death
More sharp than this is.

Imogen
Nay, stay a little!
Were you but riding forth to air yourself,
Such parting were too petty.
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Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 124

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I would this music would come

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Cloten
I would this music would come. I am advised
to give her music a-mornings; they say it will
penetrate.

And winking Mary-buds begin
To ope their golden eyes.
With everything that pretty is,
My lady sweet, arise,

 Enter Musicians.
Come on,
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Source:
Act 2
Scene 3
Line 11

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I am sorry, Cymbeline

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Lucius
I am sorry, Cymbeline,
That I am to pronounce Augustus Caesar—
Caesar, that hath more kings his servants than
Thyself domestic officers—thine enemy.
Receive it from me, then: war and confusion
In Caesar’s name pronounce I ’gainst thee. Look
For fury not to be resisted. Thus defied,
I thank thee for myself.

Receive it from me,
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Source:
Act 3
Scene 1
Line 66

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Stand by my side, you whom the gods have made Preservers of my throne

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Cymbeline, to Morgan, Polydor, and Cadwal
Stand by my side, you whom the gods have made
Preservers of my throne. Woe is my heart
That the poor soldier that so richly fought,
Whose rags shamed gilded arms, whose naked breast
Stepped before targes of proof,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 1

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Thou com’st not, Caius, now for tribute

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Cymbeline
Thou com’st not, Caius, now for tribute. That
The Britons have razed out, though with the loss
Of many a bold one, whose kinsmen have made suit
That their good souls may be appeased with slaughter
Of you their captives, which ourself have granted.
So think of your estate.

Briefly die their joys
That place them on the truth of girls and boys.
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 81

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Come, stand thou by our side

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Cymbeline, to Imogen
Come, stand thou by our side.
Make thy demand aloud. (To Iachimo.) Sir, step you forth.
Give answer to this boy, and do it freely,
Or by our greatness and the grace of it,
Which is our honor, bitter torture shall
Winnow the truth from falsehood.—On. Speak to him.
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 155

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Wake, my mistress

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Pisanio
Wake, my mistress.
Cymbeline
If this be so, the gods do mean to strike me
To death with mortal joy.
Pisanio
How fares my mistress?

If this be so, the gods do mean to strike me
To death with mortal joy.

Imogen
O, get thee from my sight!
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 275

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Why did you throw your wedded lady from you?

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Imogen, to Posthumus
Why did you throw your wedded lady from you?
Think that you are upon a rock, and now
Throw me again.
 She embraces him.

Hang there like fruit, my soul,
Till the tree die.

Posthumus
Hang there like fruit, my soul,
Till the tree die.
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 310

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We will die all three

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Belarius, as Morgan
We will die all three
But I will prove that two on ’s are as good
As I have given out him.—My sons, I must
For mine own part unfold a dangerous speech,
Though haply well for you.
Arviragus, as Cadwal
Your danger’s ours.
Guiderius,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 376

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O, rare instinct! When shall I hear all through?

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Cymbeline, to Imogen
O, rare instinct!
When shall I hear all through? This fierce abridgment
Hath to it circumstantial branches which
Distinction should be rich in. Where, how lived you?
And when came you to serve our Roman captive?
How parted with your brothers? How first met them?
Why fled you from the court?
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 5
Line 464

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