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Countess of Rossillion

All's Well That Ends Well: Countess Rousillion is a  widow. Her son Bertram is taken into the wardship of the King. The Countess takes in Helen as her ward and encourages a romance between Helen and Bertram.

In delivering my son from me, I bury a second husband

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Countess
In delivering my son from me, I bury a second husband.
Bertram
And I in going, madam, weep o’er my father’s
death anew; but I must attend his Majesty’s
command, to whom I am now in ward, evermore
in subjection.

Moderate lamentation is the right of the dead,
excessive grief the enemy to the living

Lafew
You shall find of the King a husband,
… continue reading this quote

Be thou blessed, Bertram

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Countess 
Be thou blessed, Bertram, and succeed thy father
In manners as in shape. Thy blood and virtue
Contend for empire in thee, and thy goodness
Share with thy birthright.

Love all, trust a few,
Do wrong to none

Love all, trust a few,
Do wrong to noneIsocolon
.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 1
Line 63

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I am out o’ friends, madam

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Fool
I am out o’ friends, madam, and I hope to have
friends for my wife’s sake.
Countess
Such friends are thine enemies, knave.

for young Charbon the Puritan and old
Poysam the Papist, howsome’er their hearts are
severed in religion, their heads are both one

Fool
You’re shallow,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 40

Source Type:
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You know, Helen, I am a mother to you

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Countess
You know, Helen, I am a mother to you.
Helen
Mine honorable mistress.

I know I love in vain, strive against hope,
Yet in this captious and intenible sieve
I still pour in the waters of my love

Countess
Nay, a mother.
Why not a mother? When I said “a mother,”
Methought you saw a serpent.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 1
Scene 3
Line 140

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Alas! And would you take the letter of her?

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Countess 
Alas! And would you take the letter of her?
Might you not know she would do as she has done
By sending me a letter? Read it again.

Ah, what sharp stings are in her mildest words!

Steward reads the  letter
I am Saint Jaques’ pilgrim, thither gone.
Ambitious love hath so in me offended
That barefoot plod I the cold ground upon,
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 3
Scene 4
Line 1

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What angel shall Bless this unworthy husband?

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What angel shall
Bless this unworthy husband? He cannot thrive
Unless her prayers, whom heaven delights to hear
And loves to grant, reprieve him from the wrath
Of greatest justice. Write, write, Rinaldo,
To this unworthy husband of his wife.

My heart is heavy, and mine age is weak.
Grief would have tears, and sorrow bids me speak.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 3
Scene 4
Line 26

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No, no, no, your son was misled

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Lafew
No, no, no, your son was misled with a
snipped-taffeta fellow there, whose villainous saffron
would have made all the unbaked and doughy
youth of a nation in his color. Your daughter-in-law
had been alive at this hour, and your son here
at home, more advanced by the King than by that
red-tailed humble-bee I speak of.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 4
Scene 5
Line 37

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We lost a jewel of her

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King
We lost a jewel of her, and our esteem
Was made much poorer by it. But your son,
As mad in folly, lacked the sense to know
Her estimation home.
Countess
’Tis past, my liege,
And I beseech your Majesty to make it
Natural rebellion done i’ th’ blade of youth,
When oil and fire,
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Source:
Act 5
Scene 3
Line 1

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I am not a day of season

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King
I am not a day of season,
For thou mayst see a sunshine and a hail
In me at once. But to the brightest beams
Distracted clouds give way. So stand thou forth.
The time is fair again.

For we are old, and on our quick’st decrees
Th’ inaudible and noiseless foot of time
Steals ere we can effect them.
… continue reading this quote

Source:
Act 5
Scene 3
Line 38

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